Archive for April, 2005

April 28th, 2005 by Campus Philly

another phillies’ season

Prior to last season the Phillies were the sexy pick to win the NL East. But that pick was from people outside the city, and Philadelphia ended in second place in the National League East-ten games behind the Atlanta Braves.

This season Philadelphia is expected to fight for third in the NL East (which probably means they’ll finish last). But with the season already underway and Larry Bowa replaced by the player-friendly Charlie Manuel, there are a few reasons to expect more than a third-place finish. And of course, there may be a few reasons to think of a third-place finish as a blessing.

The Florida Marlins beefed up with Carlos Delgado, the New York Mets signed Carlos Beltran and Pedro Martinez, and the expected division-winner Atlanta Braves added Tim Hudson. Who did the Phillies add? SP John Lieber should be a solid addition to a mediocre staff but his impact does not compare to those of the Phils’ NL East neighbors. Kenny Lofton will bring a veteran presence to the clubhouse, but can he be relied on to stay healthy for an entire season?

Infield:

Mike Lieberthal returned as the starting catcher. Veteran Todd Pratt, who survived a surge by A.J. Hinch in spring training, returns for his 5th season as Lieberthal’s backup. Hinch remains a prospect later in the season if Pratt or Lieberthal struggle.

Jim Thome looks to improve upon his 42 home runs from last season, although he’s already accumulating walks (with five in nine games). Chase Utley did not take over as the starting second baseman, but is sharing the role with Placido Polanco. Neither has made much of an offensive impact-with only 10 hits between them.

This is a critical year for third baseman David Bell. He has a big money contract and has not performed up to expectations. He needs to improve from last season’s stats of .291 avg., 18 HRs, and 77 RBI for the Phillies to compete. And this season? Only seven hits and two RBIs.

And remember we have reasons to finish higher than third? Yep, that’s Jimmy Rollins.

Outfield:

Pat Burrell has started the season explosively, with four HRs, 15 hits, and 17 RBIs. That’s a league-leading 17 RBIs in nine games. Last year he totaled 84, and at about a fourth of the way to last year’s totals the Phils hope he can keep it up.

Kenny Lofton, acquired in a trade with the New York Yankees is the unquestioned starter after Marlon Byrd was sent down. So far his health is holding up, but the veteran will need to stay injury-free for the entire season. Bobby Abreu is coming off a season with 30 HRs, 40 stolen bases and Thome batting behind him, and he should continue to see good pitches.

Pitching:

John Lieber is the de facto ace of the staff. His sinkerball style produces a lot of groundballs which is a good fit for Citizens Bank, and is 2-0 with an ERA under 3.50. Number-two starter Brett Myers is playing well in the beginning of the season with a win, a no decision, and a .07 ERA. Randy Wolf, the lone lefty in the rotation, was rocked in his first game of the season. He needs to lower the 6.00 ERA in the next few games or else may be sitting on the trading block. Cory Lidle and Gavin Floyd opened the season as the fourth and fifth starters, but that may change when Vicente Padilla returns from his injury.

Then there’s the bullpen. And it’s the bullpen that has lost three games. Here’s a scary stat: Tim Worrell, Pedro Liriano, Ryan Madson, Rheal Cormier, Terry Adams all have ERAs over five, and two of them have double digit ERAs. Unless the Phillies want a high draft pick, this has to change, since relief pitching is Philadelphia’s Achilles’ Heel. Billy Wagner, with one save in as many opportunities, is an elite closer when not on the disabled list and is a record 35-40 saves this season.

April 28th, 2005 by Campus Philly

another phillies’ season

Prior to last season the Phillies were the sexy pick to win the NL East. But that pick was from people outside the city, and Philadelphia ended in second place in the National League East-ten games behind the Atlanta Braves.

This season Philadelphia is expected to fight for third in the NL East (which probably means they’ll finish last). But with the season already underway and Larry Bowa replaced by the player-friendly Charlie Manuel, there are a few reasons to expect more than a third-place finish. And of course, there may be a few reasons to think of a third-place finish as a blessing.

The Florida Marlins beefed up with Carlos Delgado, the New York Mets signed Carlos Beltran and Pedro Martinez, and the expected division-winner Atlanta Braves added Tim Hudson. Who did the Phillies add? SP John Lieber should be a solid addition to a mediocre staff but his impact does not compare to those of the Phils’ NL East neighbors. Kenny Lofton will bring a veteran presence to the clubhouse, but can he be relied on to stay healthy for an entire season?

Infield:

Mike Lieberthal returned as the starting catcher. Veteran Todd Pratt, who survived a surge by A.J. Hinch in spring training, returns for his 5th season as Lieberthal’s backup. Hinch remains a prospect later in the season if Pratt or Lieberthal struggle.

Jim Thome looks to improve upon his 42 home runs from last season, although he’s already accumulating walks (with five in nine games). Chase Utley did not take over as the starting second baseman, but is sharing the role with Placido Polanco. Neither has made much of an offensive impact-with only 10 hits between them.

This is a critical year for third baseman David Bell. He has a big money contract and has not performed up to expectations. He needs to improve from last season’s stats of .291 avg., 18 HRs, and 77 RBI for the Phillies to compete. And this season? Only seven hits and two RBIs.

And remember we have reasons to finish higher than third? Yep, that’s Jimmy Rollins.

Outfield:

Pat Burrell has started the season explosively, with four HRs, 15 hits, and 17 RBIs. That’s a league-leading 17 RBIs in nine games. Last year he totaled 84, and at about a fourth of the way to last year’s totals the Phils hope he can keep it up.

Kenny Lofton, acquired in a trade with the New York Yankees is the unquestioned starter after Marlon Byrd was sent down. So far his health is holding up, but the veteran will need to stay injury-free for the entire season. Bobby Abreu is coming off a season with 30 HRs, 40 stolen bases and Thome batting behind him, and he should continue to see good pitches.

Pitching:

John Lieber is the de facto ace of the staff. His sinkerball style produces a lot of groundballs which is a good fit for Citizens Bank, and is 2-0 with an ERA under 3.50. Number-two starter Brett Myers is playing well in the beginning of the season with a win, a no decision, and a .07 ERA. Randy Wolf, the lone lefty in the rotation, was rocked in his first game of the season. He needs to lower the 6.00 ERA in the next few games or else may be sitting on the trading block. Cory Lidle and Gavin Floyd opened the season as the fourth and fifth starters, but that may change when Vicente Padilla returns from his injury.

Then there’s the bullpen. And it’s the bullpen that has lost three games. Here’s a scary stat: Tim Worrell, Pedro Liriano, Ryan Madson, Rheal Cormier, Terry Adams all have ERAs over five, and two of them have double digit ERAs. Unless the Phillies want a high draft pick, this has to change, since relief pitching is Philadelphia’s Achilles’ Heel. Billy Wagner, with one save in as many opportunities, is an elite closer when not on the disabled list and is a record 35-40 saves this season.

April 25th, 2005 by Campus Philly

art + business

The Impressionist masterpieces found in the Barnes Foundation’s Merion gallery have probably inspired many people in many ways.

But Justin Belmont may be the only person they ever inspired to create an Internet business.

Belmont, a senior art history major at Swarthmore College, runs an online art gallery called Artocity.com. It features limited editions of contemporary photographs printed on canvas by a process called giclée.

Belmont first encountered giclée (pronounced zhee-CLAY) in the Barnes Foundation’s gift shop. There, he saw reproductions of some of the paintings in the foundation’s collection that were one-tenth the size of the originals.

Belmont asked how they had been created and was told, through giclée. Digital photos of the originals were printed on canvas that was then stretched and mounted on wooden bars, just as canvas with a painting on it is.

I thought how cool it would be if we could use this technology to create original artwork, he said.

Belmont had been looking for an idea for an Internet business since the summer of 2003, when he took a course in e-business management at the London School of Economics. So, after he made some giclée prints himself and found they were inexpensive to produce, he decided to launch a business selling them online.

He recruited some photographers and computer graphics artists — he now has a dozen, including himself — wrote a business plan, got the necessary financial and legal advice, designed the Artocity Web site and launched it last August.

Artocity’s initial customers largely consisted of Belmont’s friends and family members. Now, their friends are using the site and Belmont has landed some business clients.

The first of those was the Lift Gym in Manhattan. Its manager Ken Fitzgerald gave Belmont some exterior photos of the gym and abstract shots of weights and workout equipment and asked him to make giclée prints of them.

They came out really, really nice, Fitzgerald said. We get lots of compliments on them.

Artocity prices range from $49 for 15-by-10-inch prints to $675 for 40-by-60-inch prints. Each print is individually numbered.

Belmont would like to make running Artocity his full-time job when he graduates from Swarthmore next month, but he doesn’t expect to be able to.

It’s not reasonable to assume it can pay a salary that can house, feed and clothe someone, he said. But I’m going to definitely continue working on it as much as I possibly can.

April 25th, 2005 by Campus Philly

equality forum 2005

In the City of Brotherly Love, love is celebrated in many different forms, especially at this year’s Equality Forum, which celebrates 40 years of the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered civil rights movement.

According to the website (www.equalityforum.com), “Equality Forum promotes understanding of the impact of homophobia on individuals, families and society, and advances Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender (GLBT) equality.” Equality Forum was founded in 1993 as PrideFest Philadelphia, changed its name to PrideFest America in 1999, and was finally renamed Equality Forum in 2003 to reach out to broader topics and to include international programs.

The events span seven full days, capped on May 1 by SundayOUT, a huge outdoor block party at Independence Hall and a free concert at Penn’s Landing. This year, a special focus is on the history of the Gay Rights Movement itself.

In 1965, a group of demonstrators in front of Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell staged some of the first gay and lesbian protests in America. Forty years later, Equality Forum 2005 remembers these demonstrators and gives tribute to 40 gay pioneers who have made a difference since then. Those honored include Ellen DeGeneres, Melissa Etheridge, Barney Frank, Matt Foreman, and others.

The fun starts on Monday, April 25th with a Kickoff Party and a forum on Race and Sexuality. The next several days feature more forums, film screenings, and panel discussions, as well as happy hours, mixers, and parties. SundayOUT closes Equality Forum with sixteen hours of events, including performances by 80s superstar Cindi Lauper, dance club goddess Amber, and Kate Clinton.

Check the Campus Philly calendar each day for a roster of Equality Forum Events.

April 19th, 2005 by Campus Philly

decorating without dough

Arranging empty bottles in neat rows may have sufficed as “interior decorating” in your freshman dorm, but now that you’ve moved into your own place, it’s time to take it to the next level. But wait, you protest. After paying rent, Internet fees, electricity, phone, and cable bills, where am I going to scrounge up enough money to even think about making my new digs aesthetically-pleasing? Never fear. There are plenty of options in Philly for the financially-strapped student to spice up their drab, white walls.

One of the easiest (and cheapest) ways to do this is by unleashing your inner Picasso. First, find out if your landlord has rules concerning painting. If you get the green light, head to the nearest hardware store to be greeted with a thousand different shades of paint swatches. Consider the amount of natural light your windows allow into the rooms. Bright tones or pastels will complement natural light and give your crib a sunny, cheerful feel. If you’re going for a more mysterious, exotic look, try coral shades or dark yellow for a Moroccan-inspired feel.

When it comes to furniture, IKEA is every student’s best friend. You’ll find an array of affordable and adorable kitchen and houseware items, snazzy rugs, and even cheap houseplants, an element that screams “See, this is a real home!” Ross Dress for Less on 7th and Market is also a hidden treasure for great decorative finds at discounted prices.

To add that personal touch, head to Beyond the Wall on South Street for posters and prints that range from copies of Van Gogh masterpieces to black and white headshots of Elvis. The use frames will make these “art” rather than the “posters” you taped to your dorm walls. Next door at Pearl Art & Craft Supply, you’ll find both wood frames (use any leftover wall paint for these!) and acid-free art mat frames, the latter of which can be bought for less than $2 each. Before you leave, head upstairs to the faux floral department. Here you’ll find everything from long-stemmed gladiolas to glove thistles, all made of silk. Add a funky vase to the mix, and you have a permanent eye-pleasing fixture on your dining table that will never need watering or discarding.

Before you leave the area, veer onto Fabric Row on 4th Street, where you’ll be greeted with thousands of rolls of fabric in as many colors and textures—sheer, feather, zebra-print, and even vinyl. For about $5-$10 a yard, you can make your own tapestries, curtains, or use fabrics as trimming on mirrors, frames, or shelves. Warren, of Paul’s Decorative Window Treatments, suggests using a yard or two of Asian-inspired print fabric and looping it around wooden sticks at the top and bottom to create your own silk banner, which gives walls a more elegant feel. With all these decorating elements at your disposal, it’s only a matter of time before you’ll be sending that submission tape to MTV’s Cribs.

April 14th, 2005 by Campus Philly

thrifty furniture finds

I’m often asked where I found the furniture in my apartment. From the matching lime- green crushed velvet couch and Victorian chair, to the art deco lamps and paintings, my apartment furnishing and décor, is one of a kind. And thanks to thrift-store shopping, it was cheap, too! Looking to get creative on a tight budget but don’t know where to look? Philadelphia features some of the finest thrift furniture around.

Books and Furniture: 20th Century Artifacts
529 Bainbridge Street

The name is simple and so are the deals. In between walls of used books is an assortment of desks, chairs, end tables, couches, loveseats, old TVs, lamps, and even a globe. When I visited, the store was surprisingly bustling with customers. However, you may not be successful haggling here (I saw one man try to buy a loveseat for $15 down from $30 with no success). Fortunately the store’s prices are cheap enough that there is no need to barter, and you can even pick up a book and test out a couch—it doesn’t get much better than that!

Hope on 7th Street
701 S. 7th Street
(215) 413-2301

Head to the back corner of this nestled consignment shop and you’ll discover a treasure trove of used furniture. Complete your china collection with beer glasses and tons of other cheap wares, or pick up a set of speakers at $3 each. Some of Hope’s furniture—ranging from $10 for a couch to $50 for a dresser—have an antique-feel at a small fraction of the price.

The “Thrift Store”
Located on the corner of N. Broad and Girard Ave

Just a short walk from Temple University, this “Thrift Store” is the perfect selection for those looking to spruce up a new apartment. With a great selection of used furniture spanning from $.05 armchairs (yes, this is for real) to full-length couches, end tables and bed frames, this thrift store offers deals that cannot be passed up. While you’re there, you also might want to check out their assortment of appliances, kitchenware, and electronics, including televisions, microwaves, toaster ovens, blenders, table cloths, dishes, frying pans, silver wear, wine glasses, and much, much more.

Uhuru Furniture
1220 Spruce Street
(215) 546-9616

This non-profit furniture store nestled in the University of the Arts district donates all of its proceeds to the African People’s Education and Defense Fund. If you walk by on a nice day you will see a great selection of vintage and restored couches, chairs, kitchen sets, and desks right out on the sidewalk. Inside you will find a more extensive collection of furniture and decorations such as paintings, lamps, and vases. If you are looking for art deco at a more than reasonable price, this is the place to go!

Retrospect
534 South Street
(267) 671-0116

If you have been searching for used couches and chairs with a vintage flare you might want to check out Retrospect. Despite its pricey selection of vintage clothing and accessories, Retrospect offers a small selection of used furniture and housewares at pretty reasonable prices. You can also find vintage dishes, cups and other accessories for the home. If you are looking to get artistic, Retrospect often carries used records and old photographs that can be framed and hung on your walls.

And don’t forget to check out your local Salvation Army location (http://www.salvationarmyphiladelphia.org/) for great deals on used furniture. There are multiple locations in and around Philadelphia, and below are some addresses.

Philadelphia Salvation Army Locations:

April 14th, 2005 by Campus Philly

housing guide

Philadelphia is often referred to as “The City of Neighborhoods,” and it’s true. Our city has dozens (or hundreds – depending on how you count!) of different neighborhoods, each with individual personality and flavor. To help out prospective renters, we’ve selected some areas of town popular with young people, and explained what they’re about, what kind of housing they offer, and how you can use public transit to get to where you have to go.

CENTER CITY
The physical and spiritual heart of Philadelphia, this tightly knit urban village is a model of what a city should be. Tall buildings reach for the sky; streets bustle with activity late into the night; bars and lounges pulse with music every night of the week; theaters, galleries, museums, and concert halls are plentiful enough to satisfy anyone’s need for culture. Stretching between the Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers, and between Vine and South Streets, Center City includes neighborhoods like Rittenhouse, Washington West, Old City, Chinatown, Society Hill, and more. It offers buzzing activity and tranquil side streets, urban excitement and peaceful distractions, great history next to the ultimate modernity. It is also the home of thousands of students attending Moore, University of the Arts, Art Institute, Thomas Jefferson, Curtis, and the AVA.

Housing
Every type of housing imaginable can be found in Center City, from studios to penthouses, and two-story row houses to 45-story high-rises. It can also be quite pricey, although the increasingly rare inexpensive find is still available for the diligent searcher. Expect to pay at least $700-800 for a decent one-bedroom apartment, and usually even more, especially in Old City and the blocks between Washington and Rittenhouse Squares. Sharing a row house with a couple of friends may be the best option, and can often bring the per-person cost down to about $500.

Transportation
Center City is the transit heart of Philly, with almost every route in the entire region criss-crossing on or under its streets. The Broad Street Line runs north and south, and Market-Frankford runs west and northeast. The Subway-Surface trolleys runs under Market Street before surfacing and serving University City and West Philly. All 13 Regional Rail Lines hit the three main train stations, and the PATCO train connects to South Jersey. Also, the 2, 7, 9, 12, 17, 21, 23, 25, 27, 30, 31, 32, 33, 38, 40, 42, 43, 44, 47, 48, 57, 61, 121, 124, 125, and C busses run out to the rest of the city and the inner suburbs. Rides to Penn, Drexel, USP, Temple, La Salle, CCP, and St Joe’s run 10-20 minutes, while Villanova, Bryn Mawr, Haverford, Cabrini, Arcadia, Philly U, and Swarthmore are approximately 30 minutes by Regional Rail.

UNIVERSITY CITY – POWELTON VILLAGE
A sprawling campus environment gradually fading into tree-lined, student-friendly neighborhoods, University City is home to Drexel, USP, and of course, Penn. The presence of 30-40,000 college kids ensures a lively, young atmosphere, and the ethnic neighborhoods farther west make for a diverse melting pot of languages, music, and food. Those with IDs can choose from dozens of bars – dive to trendy and almost everything between. The territory begins on the west bank of the Schuylkill River and ends at some debatable point in the 40s – perhaps 44th St, maybe 48th or 49th.

Housing
Besides dorms, much of the housing in University City and Powelton comes in the form of large three- and four-story mansions from the late-19th and early-20th Centuries. Some have been converted to apartments, while many are still intact for group rental. Close to campus, prices are high, upwards of $500 for a studio in the low-40s near Penn, and mid-30s near Drexel. Moving west, or closer to Market Street, prices drop, especially if you’re not concerned with trash and empty lots. Also, during the summer, sublets can be found extremely cheap, sometimes even less then $300 for a great room in a large house.

Transportation
The Market-Frankford Line stops at 40th, 34th, and 30th Streets (where it connects with all 13 Regional Rail lines), providing a quick link downtown (5-10 minutes). The trolleys also run downtown, with the 11, 13, 34, and 36 serving Penn’s campus and the streets west and southwest, while the 10 hits Drexel and runs northwest. Taking the trolley and then the subway to Temple or La Salle is a 30-35 minute ride. The 21 and 42 busses connect Penn to the business district and Old City, while the 40 runs straight from Spruce to South Street. The 31 and 43 buses connect Drexel to the business district and Northern Liberties, respectively.

NORTHERN LIBERTIES – FISHTOWN
The old neighborhoods north of eastern Center City have exploded with spillover from Old City’s rebirth. First NoLibs, then Fishtown (with Kensington possibly next…) have seen ancient brick houses snatched up and renovated, streets cleaned, and trendy hipster bars pop up out of nowhere. More a scene for the over-21 crowd, NoLibs and Fishtown are now known as places for artists and (pseudo) intellectuals, and those who want to be on the cusp of urban reclamation. Eclectic nightlife and musical diversity are hallmarks, and the variety of building and architecture are noteworthy. Watch out for new, indie hotspots along brand new Liberties Walk, and loads of new construction and loft conversions.

Housing
Narrow, red-brick row homes run horizon to horizon, but share space with old industrial lofts and warehouses. The area is generally more for buyers than renters, though rental units are definitely available. Many loft buildings are being converted to residential properties, and big developers are pushing hundreds of units of new construction, increasing the size and diversity of the market. Though gentrification has sent prices soaring, with some lofts going for upwards of $300k, there are still plenty of opportunities for a decent, relatively inexpensive house or apartment.

Transportation
The Market-Frankford Line stops at Spring Garden Street, walkable to NoLibs’ main action, and Girard Ave, right at the edge of Fishtown. Meanwhile, the 5 bus runs from Old City’s big bar/club stretch through NoLibs and Fishtown, and on to Frankford. Buses run from the movie theatre and big-box shopping district in South Philly, to Frankford (the 25) and Olney (the 57). Also, the 15 bus (or is it a trolley?) runs the whole length of Girard to the Zoo, Fairmount Park, and Overbrook.

SOUTH PHILLY
Long thought of as an ethnic ghetto for Italians and (formerly) Jews, South Philly now houses a melting pot of Asian, European, and American cultures. Pizza places dot the streets, along with ever-greater numbers of more upscale restaurants, while a large “Asian Market” on Washington Ave now complements the famous Italian Market on 9th. There’s argument over where “Sout’ Philly” (as the locals say) actually starts – the blocks below Washington are definitely in, but those between South and Washington (Queen Village, Bella Vista, and Graduate Hospital area) are debatable.

Housing
Hundreds of blocks of Philly row houses are the main fare of South Philly, although there are some apartment buildings and lofts to be found. Rental and owned houses are both available. Prices are generally cheap (forget about the $1 mil+ Lofts at Bella Vista), with house rentals often less than $1,000 for three- and four-bedroom units. As such, South Philly is usually for groups of students living together rather than students living alone.

Transportation
The mighty Broad Street Line is the transit spine of South Philly, connecting to Center City in less than 10 minutes, and with Temple, CCP, an
d La Salle in less than 25. Going to Penn, Drexel or USP (via Market-Frankford Line or trolley) takes less than 30 minutes. There are also many bus options. The 2 runs along 17th/18th from Erie to Oregon; the 47 runs north-south to Center City, Chinatown, NoLibs, and Olney. East-west buses run straight along Snyder from Point Breeze to the Columbus Blvd shopping centers (the 79), and along Tasker and Morris (the 29). Also, the 64 bus connects Washington Ave to West Philly and Fairmount Park and the G bus connects Oregon Ave to West Philly and Overbrook.

April 14th, 2005 by Campus Philly

you live and you learn

My sixth year of living in Philly is coming to a close and the apartment search is on again-for the fifth time. As I get older, I realize more and more what I want out of a living situation. Since I’ve made practically every mistake in the book, and learned from them, each new apartment is better than the one before.

After freshman year in a 10-by-10 cinder-block room with another maladjusted college rookie, I could hardly wait to move off-campus.

After freshman year I fled to West Philadelphia. I loved the idea of personal space and being part of a neighborhood; however, I did not foresee the drama that accompanied having an apartment.

Four Philadelphia apartments later, I think I’ve finally got a handle on things. Feel free to take these lessons with or without a grain of salt, but try not to make the same mistakes I did.

Lesson #1

April 14th, 2005 by Campus Philly

online roomies

It’s the time of the year to find a new roommate. And with the internet steadily gaining popularity as a place to meet new people, it’s no surprise that an increasing number of people are finding roommates on the internet. Looking for a roommate online can be easy and even fun.

I needed a place to live for only one semester, and since I was going home for the summer, I figured it would be cheaper to find a sublet. I flipped through the classified ads in Philadelphia Weekly for weeks and weeks, only to that find all the contracts were for one-year terms.

Then I discovered philadelphiacraigslist.org. If you click “rooms/shared” under the “housing” tab, you’ll find a list of city sublets available for rent. You can search by the price, location, or the number of bedrooms. After browsing through the online listings, you can respond directly to the person who posted the ad by e-mail, or you can call them if the number is listed.

You can also post your own ad, describing yourself as well as the ideal room, roommate, location, rent, and any other important information. An added bonus to philadelphiacraigslist.org is that you don’t have to become a member to participate, as many websites require.

However, there are some things to keep in mind when choosing a room and/or a roommate online. These are tips I learned from my own experience.

April 14th, 2005 by Campus Philly

roommate etiquette

As the spring semester comes to an end, the time has come to think about next year. You’ve considered where you want to live and with whom. Sure, you were placed with a random stranger during your freshman year, but now you have options. So how do you avoid a roommate catastrophe when rooming with a person of your choice? Whether your future roommate overly dramatizes a professional actor or cares less about anything than PS2, here’s some general guidelines for roommate etiquette the second time around: