Archive for March, 2007

March 29th, 2007 by Campus Philly

History gets inclusive

Work is under way on a $5.1 million exhibit that will depict the dual lives of the first two U.S. presidents and their slaves.

The President’s House project is planned for the southeast corner of 6th and Market streets, just a few feet from the Liberty Bell Center, on Independence Mall. The controversial exhibit will include a depiction of the lives of nine slaves that lived at the site, which was used from 1790 to 1800 and was the home of George Washington and then John Adams.

The exhibit is expected to be unveiled early next year — about six months behind the original estimate of a July Fourth opening. An official groundbreaking occurred Wednesday.

“We are one huge step closer to fulfilling an obligation to tell the truth — the whole, complicated truth — about this small parcel of land on the doorstep of the Liberty Bell Center,” Mayor John F. Street said.

Kelly/Maiello Architects and Planners, which is at 1420 Walnut St. in Center City, was picked to design the project. The design calls for a depiction of the Colonial-era house that would include incomplete walls, or “architectural fragments, around the original President’s House footprint, in order to establish a powerful, historically accurate sense of place,” the firm said.

The slave quarters will be defined in a “solemn manner.” State-of-the-art audio and interactive visual technology will tell a series of compelling stories of life in the President’s House. The original house was demolished in the 1830s.

Kelly/Maiello, a minority-owned firm, has done design work for the Philadelphia International Airport, Philadelphia School District, City Hall and other sites. The selection is pending final approval from the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation which is managing federal funds appropriated for the project.

Five architecture-and-design firms, including firms in Boston and Washington, D.C., made bids to build the President’s House exhibit on Independence Mall.

About $5.1 million has been committed, including $1.5 million from the city and $3.6 million from the federal government.

The Kelly/Maiello team will handle all phases of the project, including architectural design, content development, fabrication and installation. It will work closely with historians familiar with the site.

The site, which will include exhibits about slaves that lived in the house, will lead up to the entrance of the Liberty Bell Center. In fact, it was during the excavation of that site that some of the evidence was uncovered.

Controversy over the President’s House has raged since January 2002 when historian Edward Lawler Jr. first published findings indicating that slaves lived in it.

The exhibit will be part of about $400 million in investments on Independence Mall, including the Independence Visitor Center (opened in 2001), Liberty Bell Center (2003), the National Constitution Center (2003) and planned National Museum of American Jewish History, which will start construction this year at 5th and Market streets.

This article is reprinted with permission from the Philadelphia Business Journal. You can visit the PBJ online.

You can contact Peter Van Allen at pvanallen@bizjournals.com.

March 29th, 2007 by Campus Philly

Slow But Steady

With the Sixers and Flyers having undeniably forgettable seasons, Eagles fans have focused a lot on the off-season. Though the Phillies promise to keep us distracted with their belief that they’re the team to beat in the East, many long time Philly fans are not about to hold their breath, which brings us back to the Eagles and their off-season moves.

Though a lot of fans have felt disappointed about the Eagles letting Garcia and Stallworth leave town, this is one fan who believes the fans should be patient until the season gets underway. First, with all the complaining about losing Stallworth, lets not get confused into believing that he was as good as T.O. The reason the Saints gave him up was because he was a third or fourth string receiver and had injury problems. He missed a few games last season with the Eagles, yet was asking for money that would be paid to a player without his history. We cry over him, but we kicked T.O. out of here right along with the Eagles organization. Now I’m not a big T.O. supporter, but we should have been crying more about a true number one receiver.

Another note on letting Stallworth go is that we got Kevin Curtis, another fast receiver who may have hands that are just as reliable. Though it would be better to have a tru number one and not depend on Brown to carry the load, maybe Curtis or the other receivers will shine and make us overlook this fact.

Now onto the defense — the major reason Philly didn’t go all the way last season. All true fans know that the Eagles need a serious upgrade. It seemed at first that they were letting players slip by them (Joey Porter, Lance Briggs, etc.), and even let one slip away when they failed to keep Ryan Fowler after he signed an offer sheet. Fowler went to the Titans, and it seemed like the Eagles would be stuck with the underachieving Dhani Jones. But our patience with them may have been rewarded with two recent deals.

The first was the acquisition of Montae Reagor, a defensive tackle formerly of the Colts, via free agency. The second was a trade to bring Takeo Spikes and Kelly Holcomb to Philly for Darwin Walker and 2008 draft pick. According to experts, Spikes can play all three linebacker positions and is an excellent team leader. The only negative is that the two-time Pro Bowler only played 12 games last year, missing four due to a hamstring injury; however if Spikes is healthy, he should be a wonderful addition to a defense that was sorely lacking a strong presence against the run.

The Eagles again show that they do have some sort of plan amongst the free agent madness, and the best is yet to come.

You can contact Carl Pierce at CarlPierce3@hotmail.com..

March 29th, 2007 by Campus Philly

Student Rights 101

There has been quite a bit of media attention recently on the strike at the Community College of Philadelphia. What hasn’t been publicized is the sentiment of the students.

One must wonder whether it is boredom, frustration, or just plain apathy that has kept the students’ views quiet so long. It has been evident that, whether intentional or not, both sides embroiled in this battle have forgotten about the obvious truth: the students are the reason for everyone’s job in the first place.

If not for the students, there would be no college, and thus no paychecks for anyone to pick up. This fact seems largely ignored.

However, at 1:30 p.m. on March 21, 2007, the students took action and protested their forgotten rights in front of the Mint Building. They wanted to be given a product for which they have paid in full: their education. Harmony Thompson, an art student at CCP, organized the demonstration.

The front doors to the Mint Building were locked only upon the start of the student rally, which had never been the case previously. The students were also greeted with campus security guards and members of the Philadelphia police department, although it was an entirely peaceful protest. Eventually, a liaison from the administration arrived to announce that twenty students would be allowed to meet with Lynette Brown-Sow, a representative of Stephen M. Curtis, President of CCP.

Once inside, Brown-Sow fielded questions from the students, and made an effort to plead the administration’s stance on contract negotiations. The student’s questions did not represent either side of the argument, but focused primarily on their future at the college.

James O’Mahony, a science major at CCP, said that he asked a single question, with a possible answer of yes, no, or unable to answer. “I was answered with a follow-up question, spin, and rhetoric that put me no closer to the answer to the question I presented,” O’Mahony said.

After this meeting, most of the students left feeling frustrated and confused instead of informed. What will happen to the college has not yet been decided, but what is certain is that those losing the most are the students, who have the least amount of rights in the ordeal. This has left many students to consider transferring to other schools, dropping out entirely, or seeking attorneys.

As Brown-Sow declared in the meeting that afternoon, the negotiations over this matter began last January, and could last until next January, or beyond. Although, by that point, will the college even have any students left to continue?

UPDATE: The Community College of Philadelphia resumed classes on Monday, March 26.

You can contact Amanda O’Mahony at cameraeye82@yahoo.com..

March 29th, 2007 by Campus Philly

Sutdent Rights 101

There has been quite a bit of media attention recently on the strike at the Community College of Philadelphia. What hasn’t been publicized is the sentiment of the students.

One must wonder whether it is boredom, frustration, or just plain apathy that has kept the students’ views quiet so long. It has been evident that, whether intentional or not, both sides embroiled in this battle have forgotten about the obvious truth: the students are the reason for everyone’s job in the first place.

If not for the students, there would be no college, and thus no paychecks for anyone to pick up. This fact seems largely ignored.

However, at 1:30 p.m. on March 21, 2007, the students took action and protested their forgotten rights in front of the Mint Building. They wanted to be given a product for which they have paid in full: their education. Harmony Thompson, an art student at CCP, organized the demonstration.

The front doors to the Mint Building were locked only upon the start of the student rally, which had never been the case previously. The students were also greeted with campus security guards and members of the Philadelphia police department, although it was an entirely peaceful protest. Eventually, a liaison from the administration arrived to announce that twenty students would be allowed to meet with Lynette Brown-Sow, a representative of Stephen M. Curtis, President of CCP.

Once inside, Brown-Sow fielded questions from the students, and made an effort to plead the administration’s stance on contract negotiations. The student’s questions did not represent either side of the argument, but focused primarily on their future at the college.

James O’Mahony, a science major at CCP, said that he asked a single question, with a possible answer of yes, no, or unable to answer. “I was answered with a follow-up question, spin, and rhetoric that put me no closer to the answer to the question I presented,” O’Mahony said.

After this meeting, most of the students left feeling frustrated and confused instead of informed. What will happen to the college has not yet been decided, but what is certain is that those losing the most are the students, who have the least amount of rights in the ordeal. This has left many students to consider transferring to other schools, dropping out entirely, or seeking attorneys.

As Brown-Sow declared in the meeting that afternoon, the negotiations over this matter began last January, and could last until next January, or beyond. Although, by that point, will the college even have any students left to continue?

UPDATE: The Community College of Philadelphia resumed classes on Monday, March 26.

You can contact Amanda O’Mahony at cameraeye82@yahoo.com..

March 20th, 2007 by Campus Philly

Samuel S. Fels Fund Internships

Intern. The word may conjure images of copy machines, coffee grounds, and, if you’re lucky, a stipend. But graduate students have a different option.

The Samuel S. Fels Fund sponsors 25 summer internships at a variety of nonprofit organizations in Philadelphia. Each internship lasts 10 weeks, pays $6,000, and involves work on a specific project—with no grunt work.

The internships are open to any graduate student, including professional students in law and medical programs, which the projects reflect. Several are involved with dramaturgy and the arts; one is seeking a socially conscious engineer to research and design a solar air heater; another involves identifying plants in the Wissahickon Valley Park; and there are also numerous public service-related opportunities.

Each organization offering an internship is also a current grantee of the Samuel S. Fels Fund. The Fund has a current budget of $2.5million for the next few years, and the internship program, at $150,000 a year, is a sizable chunk of that budget.

Timothy Murray of the Fels Fund explained, “typically about 100 organizations submit projects and they are reviewed internally by staff and the Fels board.”

The 25 accepted projects further the Fund’s mission by addressing specific needs in the Philadelphia community.

Since 1982, “about 600” graduate students, defined as “anyone who will begin, is in, or has graduated from a graduate or professional (law, medicine, etc.) program in calendar year 2007,“ have worked at Philadelphia nonprofits. Some of those interns now work in Philadelphia and supervise interns.

Last year, graduate students from all over the country came to Philly to work as Fels Fund interns. Masters, Ph.D, and law students from schools including the University of Texas-Austin, Howard University, UCLA, and several local colleges spent their summer in Philadelphia.

This summer, interns can work with Planned Parenthood Southeastern Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Live Arts Festival and Philly Fringe, Public Interest Law Center, White Dog Cafe Foundation, and many others.

The projects are largely research-based, which require skills grad student should be familiar with. Grantee organizations find well-prepared students to complete individual projects, such as identifying resources for Mexican families with young children.

Interns complete the summer with a stellar resume point; the experience of putting their studies into practice; and strong connections in the Philadelphia area. With the support of the Fels Fund, everyone benefits and is well compensated for that work.

At the end of February, the project postings were placed on the website. As the positions fill, the site is updated.

The position with the Philadelphia Museum of Art has been filled; so if you are a graduate student interested in applying for the program—get to it!

Some internships fill faster than others, but Mr. Murray pointed out that “the majority of the interns are identified by early May.”

The Fels Fund website lists the contact information for the person at each organization fielding internship applications. Applications are NOT submitted to the Fels Fund directly.

The Fels Fund website has all the necessary information about the program, and specific project-related questions should be directed to the internship organization.

These internships are only for graduate students, but undergrads should take note of the wealth of opportunities available if they want to remain in or return to Philly as grad students.

No matter what your field, you should check this site. Chances are, there will be a supremely rewarding and interesting project just waiting for your application.

You can contact Erika Owens at eaopmk@gmail.com.

March 16th, 2007 by Campus Philly

Younger Women’s Task Force

Philadelphia’s college campuses are packed with motivated young women. They are active in their majors and campus organizations. They are leaders and workers, strong and influential in their activist circles. But what happens after college?

Too old for student groups, but too young for many older women’s organizations—where do these young professionals channel their leadership skills, honed by years of involvement in collegiate women’s rights?

“There’s a huge gap in the women’s movement,” said Yesenia Rosado, Chapter Director of Younger Women’s Task Force. “Younger Women’s Task Force’s goal is to…bridge that gap so after college there is something to get involved in.”

Younger Women’s Task Force (YWTF) was founded in 2004 as a project of the National Council of Women’s Organizations, to provide young women with the tools to become strong leaders.

With twelve chapters in major cities nation-wide, YWTF found a home in Philadelphia in August 2005. At an event honoring the anniversary of women’s suffrage, future Philadelphia chapter founders Rosado and Andrea Tanner heard YWTF founder Alison Stein speak. After consulting with her, they decided to bring YWTF to Philadelphia. Now, over a year later, the Philadelphia chapter of YWTF boasts 150 e-mail members.

Governed by an executive board of young women, YWTF seeks to provide its members with resources in navigating the professional world.

“We … gear [our programs] to what we’re interested in and what we feel younger women would like to know about,” explains Rosado. “We tend to focus on empowerment—things that would help a woman become more independent and knowledgeable…”

Networking with more experienced professional women, and managing finances are the top issues YWTF faces.

“I feel that men already have a lot of mentors and people to talk to and women don’t [have mentors] in higher positions, so a lot of young professionals struggle with being more aggressive in that sense,” says Rosado. “I think women are natural leaders, but we’re more tentative to express it. Sometimes we just don’t have the resources as easily as men do.”

To meet these needs, YWTF has hosted events, such as a panel on the human papillomavirus (HPV); lobbying for women’s issues in Harrisburg; finance workshops; and their biggest event to date—the Women in Leadership Conference. With speakers like State Representative Cherelle Parker, the conference focused on women’s organizations and roles in politics.

YTWF encourages its members to become involved in the planning of events.

“It all depends on how much the member wants to get involved. I encourage everyone to give us ideas and get on we have planning committees,” says Rosado. “We always try to say that there’s no [time minimum]. If you can only do an hour a week that’s fine, anything is great.”

Drexel senior Jennifer Vondran is one member who, despite having class during most of YTWF’s meetings, found a way to become involved. As a member of the planning committee for the Women in Leadership Conference, Vondran was in charge of recruiting students from University City.

Involvement in YWTF has also been helpful to Vondran’s professional development—a major goal of the organization.

“It’s nice just to talk to older women who are already working—women who are excited and passionate about politics and societal issues,” said Vondran. “[They are] people outside my circle of friends who I know I can call and get together with and talk about things with. It’s a network and it’s important because you’re able to reach outside of your major and actually do other things—a diversity of interests and diversity of backgrounds and just another way of extending your network and [creating] camaraderie.”

Looking toward its second year, YWTF wants to concentrate more on issues unique to Philadelphia and foster the unity it has built among young professional women so far.

“I just feel that if we start working more as a group we can encourage each other,” says Rosado. “We can give each other the resources to [become better] leaders and if anything do what we do better.”

To learn more about Younger Women’s Task Force, go to http:// ncwo-online.org/YWTF/PA/Philly.htm.

You can contact Prasana William at community@campusphilly.org

March 16th, 2007 by Campus Philly

The Struggle of a Sixer

In the mind of a Sixers Fan, these past weeks have been a real breath of fresh air—or have they?

The Sixers have pulled off seven, straight, surprising victories. They won against the second best-ranked team, the Phoenix Suns, on Feb. 28, and pulled off tough wins against the Los Angeles Lakers and Indiana Pacers.

Although news like this is usually a cause for celebration, it seems to be causing confusion, instead. Should Sixers fans be happy that the team is looking toward a spot in the playoffs, or should they be mad that they could lose their chances at a nice deal in the draft?

Lately, Philly fans have been fickle and their support hasn’t been at its peak. Sixers fans didn’t really see their team as having a chance this season, and so they put their hopes into a better future with newly drafted franchise players.

Talks around the league have been suggesting how helpful Kevin Durant and Greg Oden could be for the Sixers in the long run. Then, the stands would fill up again and maybethe team could start to rebuild for the better.

But before the fans get their hopes up about the next few seasons to come, two things need to be considered. Chances are that both Durant and Oden may not even enter the draft, and it might be too soon to doubt the heart of the Sixers.

Is it ever really okay to lose? How can people who call themselves fans hope to finish among the worst?

Personally, I could never do such a thing—and this is exactly what the Sixers must be saying to themselves. They may be ruining their “chance” (that’s right, I said chance) at a better future, but still—how can they justify losing on purpose?

Let’s look on the bright side. There are still about 19 games left in the season, and that is more than enough time to get a remaining spot in the playoff roster. The Sixers are actually only five games behind the current holders of the seventh and eighth Eastern playoff spots, the Indiana Pacers and the Orlando Magic.

With the way that Andre Miller and Igoudala are playing, it’s plausible that the Sixers can expect more wins to come. Igoudala has averaged 18.3 PPG and 5.6 APG this season, while Miller has been throwing up numbers like 13.5 PPG and 8.1 APG. Even Samuel Dalembert has begun to contribute, with an average of around 11.8 rebounds in the past few games.

It is safe to say that the players are finally starting to come together and find their niche. A continuing streak is more than possible, and at least the Sixers can pride themselves on not giving up. After all—a real loss is always more valuable than a fake loss, especially when the best effort is given.

Children are always taught to try their best and never give up, so why should we judge the Sixers for following this credo? In the end, hopefully they will be able to do enough to regain our trust and support.

You can contact Rosemary Hau at tua04296@temple.edu

March 16th, 2007 by Campus Philly

Joe Coffee Bar

Your non-fat, decaf, soy latte might be missing something—a social conscious. Fortunately, Joe Coffee Bar is here to save your favorite caffeinated beverage from the throes of ignorance. The eclectic café, just around the corner from the Forrest Theatre, provides the best fairly traded coffee drinks and tea in Center City, as well as a variety of Italian sodas and delectable pastries.

From the atmosphere to the excellent service, I don’t have one negative word to say about Joe. Walls decked with the work of local artists frame a charming and colorful space littered with tables of all sizes.

The best part of Joe’s set up is the “living room” in the center. Remember Central Perk, where the regulars of “Friends” used to hang out—it’s just like that. Complete with sofas and a coffee table covered with the finest and most entertaining selection of magazines, the “living room” space at Joe is ideal for chilling on a lazy Saturday afternoon.

The staff at Joe is far friendlier than any barista I’ve ever encountered at Starbucks. They offer a side of conversation for every cup of coffee they dish out. I ordered their Café Au Lait, and although it’s hard to go wrong with that drink, it was amazingly rich and kept me going through a whole Lit paper.

In addition to providing quality fairly traded and organic products, Joe offers a variety of sugars. Raw sugar made my drink a sweeter experience than regular refined sugar.

The pastries stole the show from the coffee, however. I ordered a chocolate croissant, which satisfied me, but didn’t taste very different from the kind I get at the supermarket.

On the other hand, the almond croissant took breakfast pastries to a whole new level. Gently flaking across my tongue, the croissant held layer upon delicate layer. I was expecting a dry, salty, nutty center, but was surprised when I came to a sticky sweet almond paste. The filling permeated the rest of the layers much like baklava. I’ve never been so sorry to finish my food.

Joe Coffee Bar is the epitome of a city café. With its quirky artwork and welcoming interior, this coffee bar is a great pre-theater treat. With its emphasis on fair trade and organic food, you can have your coffee guilt-free!

Joe Coffee Bar

1100 Walnut St.

215.592.7384

www.joecoffeebar.com

You can contact Prasana William at community@campusphilly.org

March 16th, 2007 by Campus Philly

Younger Women’s Task Force

Philadelphia’s college campuses are packed with motivated young women. They are active in their majors and campus organizations. They are leaders and workers, strong and influential in their activist circles. But what happens after college?

Too old for student groups, but too young for many older women’s organizations—where do these young professionals channel their leadership skills, honed by years of involvement in collegiate women’s rights?

“There’s a huge gap in the women’s movement,” said Yesenia Rosado, Chapter Director of Younger Women’s Task Force. “Younger Women’s Task Force’s goal is to…bridge that gap so after college there is something to get involved in.”

Younger Women’s Task Force (YWTF) was founded in 2004 as a project of the National Council of Women’s Organizations, to provide young women with the tools to become strong leaders.

With twelve chapters in major cities nation-wide, YWTF found a home in Philadelphia in August 2005. At an event honoring the anniversary of women’s suffrage, future Philadelphia chapter founders Rosado and Andrea Tanner heard YWTF founder Alison Stein speak. After consulting with her, they decided to bring YWTF to Philadelphia. Now, over a year later, the Philadelphia chapter of YWTF boasts 150 e-mail members.

Governed by an executive board of young women, YWTF seeks to provide its members with resources in navigating the professional world.

“We … gear [our programs] to what we’re interested in and what we feel younger women would like to know about,” explains Rosado. “We tend to focus on empowerment—things that would help a woman become more independent and knowledgeable…”

Networking with more experienced professional women, and managing finances are the top issues YWTF faces.

“I feel that men already have a lot of mentors and people to talk to and women don’t [have mentors] in higher positions, so a lot of young professionals struggle with being more aggressive in that sense,” says Rosado. “I think women are natural leaders, but we’re more tentative to express it. Sometimes we just don’t have the resources as easily as men do.”

To meet these needs, YWTF has hosted events, such as a panel on the human papillomavirus (HPV); lobbying for women’s issues in Harrisburg; finance workshops; and their biggest event to date—the Women in Leadership Conference. With speakers like State Representative Cherelle Parker, the conference focused on women’s organizations and roles in politics.

YTWF encourages its members to become involved in the planning of events.

“It all depends on how much the member wants to get involved. I encourage everyone to give us ideas and get on we have planning committees,” says Rosado. “We always try to say that there’s no [time minimum]. If you can only do an hour a week that’s fine, anything is great.”

Drexel senior Jennifer Vondran is one member who, despite having class during most of YTWF’s meetings, found a way to become involved. As a member of the planning committee for the Women in Leadership Conference, Vondran was in charge of recruiting students from University City.

Involvement in YWTF has also been helpful to Vondran’s professional development—a major goal of the organization.

“It’s nice just to talk to older women who are already working—women who are excited and passionate about politics and societal issues,” said Vondran. “[They are] people outside my circle of friends who I know I can call and get together with and talk about things with. It’s a network and it’s important because you’re able to reach outside of your major and actually do other things—a diversity of interests and diversity of backgrounds and just another way of extending your network and [creating] camaraderie.”

Looking toward its second year, YWTF wants to concentrate more on issues unique to Philadelphia and foster the unity it has built among young professional women so far.

“I just feel that if we start working more as a group we can encourage each other,” says Rosado. “We can give each other the resources to [become better] leaders and if anything do what we do better.”

To learn more about Younger Women’s Task Force, go to http:// ncwo-online.org/YWTF/PA/Philly.htm.

You can contact Prasana William at community@campusphilly.org

March 16th, 2007 by Campus Philly

Another Week Without Classes

Last week, 1400 faculty and staff at the Community College of Philadelphia went on strike, cancelling classes indefinitely for 37,000 students.

Members of the Faculty and Staff Federation, American Federation of Teachers, Local 2026 and college administration are unable to reach an agreement over a new five-year contract. The college is offering average annual salary increases of 3.62 percent, but employees are asking for 3.92 percent average increases.

The average salary for a full-time assistant professor with a doctorate at CCP is $55,900. That is less than the average salary for a Philadelphia school district teacher, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Education. A labor mediator has met with both sides, but the college is holding firm with its offer.

Although CCP faculty members earn less than their counterparts at some other regional community colleges, they do enjoy a lucrative benefit: no health care premiums. That issue is not at stake, and the college will continue to pay the premiums for its employees.

One issue at stake is a recently launched 1.5 million dollar advertising campaign. The college plans to start its first capital fundraising effort next year. In defense of the ad spending, CCP President Stephen Curtis told the Philadelphia Inquirer, “We need visibility in the community so that when we approach donors, they know why we have value.”

Union officials believe that money would be better spent on salaries.

“We want to invest in our employees. I think that is absolutely important to the institution,” Curtis said.

Another issue is lack of funding from the city. The operating budget is supplied by the State, the City of Philadelphia, and tuition dollars.

According to Curtis, Philadelphia only contributes 19 percent of the budget; and CCP’s $3,500 tuition is already higher than the national average for community colleges, which is $2,200.

CCP has points of pride. Its dual admissions program allows students to fulfill requirements toward a bachelor’s degree at eight regional universities. The college offers free job training to workers at local companies. It ranks in the top 20 in minority community college graduates; and 40 percent of current students are the first in their families to attend college.

Fay Beauchamp, an English and humanities professor, said of her students, “They’re creative, expressive, wonderful, interesting people. . .They have the chance, from here, to go anywhere they want.”

Right now, the students want what is fair for their teachers. Business student and Student Government President Salah Saunders sympathized with both the teachers and the students by saying that the faculty deserve a higher salary, but not at the expense of students.

There are some rumblings over the walkout. Students with plans to take summer classes, like communications major Taifa Savage, worried the strike would change their plans. Striking faculty are also concerned about the academic impact of a prolonged work stoppage. Assistant chemistry professor Michael Byler worries about the effect on a summer program he coordinates.

Most students, though, support the faculty. “It’s a pain, but they’re fighting for what they deserve, said computer science major Brandon Quzack.

Art history student Kristina Djordjervicova said, “We have some really great professors, and they need to get this resolved.”

You can contact Danielle Bullen atdaniellebullen@yahoo.com. .