Archive for May, 2007

May 31st, 2007 by Campus Philly

Dangers of Late Night Eating

We’ve all heard it time after time: Don’t eat late at night! Supposedly, eating right before bedtime can cause serious weight gain—it’s reported that even Oprah’s home kitchen closes at 7:30 p.m. It’s time to find out whether this mythical statement is fact or fiction.

Turns out—it’s partially true. Although AskMen.com states that there is no existing study that shows a direct correlation between eating closer to bedtime and weight gain, if you eat large quantities of food before you go to bed every single night, your actions could have pretty bad consequences for your weight. Grabbing a slice of pizza at midnight every once in a while won’t make you obese, but you may want to keep an eye on your overall late-night intake.

Scientifically speaking, it does make sense. Your activity and metabolism normally slow down as the day goes on. By evening, you’re not running around as much as you do throughout the day, so your body doesn’t need calories for fuel. That means that any extra calories that you consume with midnight snacks are not burned off, but stored—as fat.

You can still eat late from time to time, but be smart about it. Obviously, a lot of carbohydrates before bed could pack on some pounds. If you do feel the need to snack before hitting the sack, skip out on the potato chips and soda. Try a light snack, such as celery and peanut butter with a glass of water.

Even better—avoid the problem altogether by eating vegetables or lean proteins at dinnertime. These will fill you up so you won’t grow hungry later on. Your body repairs itself at night, and proteins such as chicken and turkey will help that process. What’s great about these foods is that they are less likely to be stored as fat in your body overnight.

So, don’t make a habit out of eating late. Chronic late night eating can lead to an actual disease called Night Eating Syndrome, or NES. It affects only 1.5 percent of the population, but it is still very serious, as it is an eating disorder that affects both your mood and your sleep. Those who suffer from NES tend to consume large amounts of food after dinnertime; repeating this behavior over time leads to weight gain and eventually, obesity.

Late night snacking is fine every once in a while, as long as it’s done lightly. Don’t let it get out of control, though, or you could end up with a side of extra weight to go with those cheese fries you ordered!

You can contact Erin Pollock at food@campusphilly.org.

May 31st, 2007 by Campus Philly

UPenn Lacrosse Run Ends

In a devastating 12-2 loss to the number-1 ranked team, Northwestern, the University of Pennsylvania women’s lacrosse team’s fairy tale season came to an end. The Quakers, who went 16-2, have brought their season to a bittersweet close after hosting their first NCAA final four game in the program’s history.

The Northwestern Wildcats were leading, 8 – 0, at halftime, but Penn’s Chrissy Muller and Becca Edwards scored in the second half, putting Penn on the scoreboard. Despite losing, the opportunity to play in the final four game at home in front of 6,428 fans was just as important as the hunt for the national title.

Head Coach Karin Brower, who saw her team improve from last season’s 10-6 record, had this to say, “We have come a long, long way and it’s been a wonderful year for us. We are really proud that we made it here, and it is a dream come true for us to be in the Final Four.”

Muller scored with 16:59 left in the second half, but by then it was simply too late. Within minutes, the Wildcats scored two more goals before Edwards hit her goal with 4:46 to go.

Northwestern executed their game perfectly in the first half, taking a chance when opportunity presented itself. Regardless of how well the Wildcats played, Penn had their chances, having two shots blocked and hitting three posts.

This game marked the lowest scoring game from the Quakers since 2001 against Yale. But even though the score might indicate otherwise, statistics-wise, the game was neck-in-neck. Northwestern led shots 21-20 and turnovers 17-16; also, the two teams tied on ground balls at 15, and draw controls at 8.

“Nobody thought we’d be in this tournament, let alone the Final Four. We set a standard for what we want Penn lacrosse to be,” said Brower. Despite the loss, Brower and her team still appreciated and took full advantage of the once-in-a-lifetime chance to play in a final four game at home.

You can contact Sara J. Gamble at sportsrec@campusphilly.org.

May 31st, 2007 by Campus Philly

Scoring an Internship

Imagine preparing meals for gorillas and monkeys, then watching surgery performed on a chimpanzee.

Picture yourself in the audience of a performance that you helped produce with the Philadelphia Theatre Company.

Ever thought about seeing your byline in the Philadelphia Inquirer?

These are just some of the opportunities available to college students seeking internships in the Philadelphia area. Many businesses offer internships not only in the summer, but during the school year for college credit as well. Most colleges and universities offer internship-for-credit programs, an ideal situation for those who need to work full-time during the summer to earn money for the school year. Many of these positions are a worthwhile investment for those looking to gain professional experience that goes beyond copying files and making coffee.

Here are some highlights of interesting local opportunities:

The Philadelphia Zoo offers a comprehensive internship program that covers everything from animal care to public relations. Animal care interns are responsible for helping to feed and train animals, along with maintaining their enclosures. Although this sort of internship may leave you elbow-deep in elephant dung, it’s invaluable real-life experience for those interested in zoology and other animal sciences. The Zoo also offers business-oriented internships in areas such as marketing, development, and human-resources. For more information, visit www.philadelphiazoo.orgunder the “About Us” section.

For those interested in the arts, the Philadelphia Theatre Company also offers a wide range of internships in areas such as dramaturgy, casting, and production. Their Career Development Initiative is aimed at recruiting college students interested in working at all levels of theater production, which includes marketing and sales. The Philadelphia Theatre Company offers internship programs year-round, and job descriptions are available on their website www.phillytheatreco.com/education

So, how do you go about setting up the perfect internship for your area of interest? How do you get college credit? For starters, speak with your school advisor about any programs offered by your university. Find out whether or not you would need to take other classes while completing your internship, and see what kinds of hours you would be available to work. Career development centers on campus should have an internship database with helpful information.

Independent online research can also produce valuable results. Finding an internship can often be as simple as visiting the website of a company you love. Many businesses give descriptions of available internship programs online, along with contact and application information.

Don’t forget to use your own personal resources: call up friends, family members, and former employers who may have connections to positions that are not necessarily advertised to the general public.

You can contact Clare Herlihy at professional@campusphilly.org.

May 30th, 2007 by Campus Philly

Taking Out the Trash

When six of the fifteen Nittany Lions present during a fight in April were arrested, Coach Joe Paterno put his foot down and said enough. Paterno was particularly disturbed that such a large percentage of his starting line-up had jeopardized the entire team by risking jail time for an off-campus fight.

Paterno has been coaching for four decades, and he clearly does not care about the circumstances of the fight. He believes that his players should keep their composure because the season’s success rides on each individual player.

Not waiting for the legal system or Penn State’s judicial courts to work it out, Paterno delivered one of the harshest punishments in recent collegiate sports history by sentencing the entire team to clean Beaver Stadium after every home game.

The job of cleaning the stadium usually goes to another club sport on campus, such as rugby or crew for fundraising efforts. However, it will now be handed over to the boys of Saturday. The other clubs will still receive the $5,000 for the job they would have originally done, but it will be the football team cleaning up spilled beer and nachos this season.

In a world where football team players are treated as celebrities, the 80-year-old Paterno holds the players to higher standards from a different era. The whole team will participate in the clean-up, not just those arrested. Paterno explained this decision to the Harrisburg Patriot-News.

“’Cause we’re all in it together. This is a team embarrassment. I wouldn’t call it anything much other than that,” he said.

The incident in April developed when Anthony Scirrotto and his girlfriend were insulted, and Scirrotto punched the person who did the insulting. Eventually Scirrotto called some of his other teammates, and they went to an off-campus party and a big fight ensued.

With all the legal battles still being figured out, Paterno does not care about hurting feelings or scaring away future recruits. What he does care about is upholding the Penn State reputation, and how he will do his best to clean everything up—starting first with Beaver Stadium.

You can contact Sara J. Gamble at sportsrec@campusphilly.org

May 30th, 2007 by Campus Philly

Best Coffee in Philly

So, you’re walking around the city itching for a caffeine fix, but are flustered with possibilities of where to go. Where exactly is there a good place to get a good cup o’ joe in the city of Philadelphia?

It’s tempting and convenient to go to the big coffee conglomerates, such as Dunkin’ Donuts or the infamous Starbucks, but there are coffee shops out there that may have more to offer. They may be a little less conspicuous, but I promise you, seeking these quaint shops is well worth a cup of a warm hug.

If you’re in Old City, visit Old City Coffee. This coffee shop between 2nd and 3rd streets (not very far from the Franklin Fountain) is a quaint place. It offers a variety of blends and lots of tasty treats. I’d suggest the zucchini bread coupled with a hot cup of coffee. There is a nice area to sit and lounge in, or even study. There is also free wireless DSL, and students are welcomed with open arms.

One of my personal favorites sits right at 13th and Pine: the Last Drop. This shop has an endless selection of teas and coffees. A word of caution, though—it is a cash-only business. However, there is an ATM conveniently located downstairs. This coffee shop is usually filled with customers busily working away on laptops or relaxing with their cups.

Another favorite café of mine is just a quick bike or subway ride away from Temple’s campus. Mugshotsis located on 19th and Fairmount (right across from the Pennsylvania State Penitentiary). These fair-trade loving coffee brewers serve some of the best around. There are also great sandwiches that will have your mouth watering. Like the Last Drop, Mugshots only accepts cash, but also offers an ATM. A free computer is available for customer use, along with Wifi. I like coming to this coffee shop to unwind and chat with friends while looking at the photography and artwork on the walls, which switches from month to month.

No matter where you’re looking for a cup o’ joe, it doesn’t take more than a peek to discover the hidden nooks of Philadelphia’s underground coffee world. These shops don’t only have great coffee and teas to offer, but they develop personal relationships with each customer, and provide a haven for those sick of the unrelenting corporations of coffee.

You can contact Tiffany Yoon at tiffanyyoon379@gmail.com.

May 25th, 2007 by Campus Philly

NFL Game to Be Played in London

Fasten your seatbelts, fans, and hold on tight—this season the NFL is throwing a “Hail Mary” pass and sending two teams to play in London, England. A game between the New York Giants and the Miami Dolphins will be played in the new Wembley Stadium.

The day tickets became available, the first 40,000 tickets sold at the stadium in 90 minutes flat, but only account for half the amount planned to go on sale. Tickets for the Oct. 28 game were first made available to fans in London, and will be available to the rest of Europe through random selection. Tickets in the United States are expected to be released soon.

Within three days of the game’s announcement, there were over 500,000 requests for tickets to the commissioner. Prices are similar to those for tickets to FA Cup games, ranging from $90 (66.50 Euro) to $180 (133 Euro).

The game will be broadcast on television as usual in the United States, leaving die-hard fans to sit and watch in front of the tube instead of the usual game day celebrations.

Alistair Kirkwood, the managing director for the NFL UK, claims that both the Dolphins and Giants are doing research about U.S. ticket sales; however, he acknowledges that “it comes down to best guessing.” What it really comes to down to is if the fans really willing to fly across seas to watch their favorite team play in a stadium different from the norm.

With the money aspect figured in, it’s safe to say that the “average Joe” American fan won’t be present, but it might be an exciting opportunity for rich fans who can afford the airfare and tickets.

Regardless of the overwhelming requests for tickets to the London game, reactions in Miami have been less welcoming. Even though the team will only lose one of its eight home games, not including playoffs, South Florida is heavily populated by ex-New Yorkers who were looking forward to the New York Giants rolling through town, as they only have twice before, in 1993 and 1996.

A fan on a Giants website had this to say, “It absolutely sucks for us Giants fans in Miami, I live two miles from Dolphin Stadium and I’ve been looking forward to going to this game and I’m telling you this would’ve been like a home game for the Giants. I agree with the concept of expanding the NFL, but this was the wrong game. New York-Miami rivalry is the best there is.”

The ticket might be hot, but are the cities’ fans biting? Only time will tell when the release of the United States tickets begin, so sit tight and get ready to charge your favorite credit card, because this game will be anything but ordinary.

You can contact Sara Gamble at sportsrec@campusphilly.org.

May 25th, 2007 by Campus Philly

Break the Habit

Let’s face it: food is a major part of college life. If you’re anything like me, it takes up 75 percent of your time. I eat while I work, while I drive…it’s a little ridiculous. So, as a consequence, most of the money I make goes toward that food. And therein lies the classic struggle of the American college student.

One article in Young Money states that only 36 percent of students are secure in their finances, affirming the most commonly spoken sentence in the world of higher education—“I’m broke.” While there are usually ways to get around the other expenses, such as buying books off of Amazon or sharing with a friend, food is a necessity. So, you might rationalize your spending by arguing that it’s unavoidable—after all, you can’t just starve yourself!

Well, here are some survival tips that any student can apply to his or her own life in order to break this cycle. As it turns out, all you need is some common sense and a lot of self-control!

#1- Return to the days of sack lunches.
This is especially helpful for the commuters out there. When on campus with no dorm to run to for a quick snack, chances are your first impulse is to run to the closest lunch truck. STOP! Set aside 10 minutes each morning before you leave to pack a good lunch—sandwich, water, maybe even a Tasty Kake. Look at it this way—buying a half-pound of lunchmeat will last you the whole week and cost about $4. Buying a slice of pizza and a soda will cost you about the same per day. That adds up to at least $20 a week. Not only will packing lunch save you money, you’ll be eating healthier, too! A nice egg-salad sandwich rather than a greasy cheesesteak every day can do a lot for you waist as well as your wallet.

#2- Think of something better to do.
Boredom is a horrible thing. Even worse is that the most common solution to boredom tends to be eating. Surely, you can find a better way to pass the time. Work out, go for a walk, or pick up a good book. Be productive!

#3 Resist peer pressure.
Yep, not only can peers pressure you to drink, but they can also pressure you to eat! Tell me if this scenario doesn’t sound familiar: you’ve just met some new people, maybe friends, maybe co-workers, and they want to go out to lunch. You think for a moment. This is a great opportunity to get to know them, but there’s only $20 left in your checking account. Make your connections elsewhere and rely on your own personal strengths—not the food court.

#4 Resist temptation.
It can be difficult when walking around campus in Philly. Lunch trucks line the streets. You walk by and smell French fries, burgers, buffalo wings…Don’t give in! It’s a trap! Stock your fridge with some essential snacks—fruit, water, sandwich fixings, etc.—and you’ll be better off. Once again, they’ll last longer and leave you feeling healthier.

There are ways to get around the food problem, and while they might not make you a millionaire, you’ll certainly find yourself with some extra bills in your pocket.

You can contact Erin Pollock at food@campusphilly.org.

May 25th, 2007 by Campus Philly

Dawn Staley

Current Temple women’s basketball head coach and three-time Olympic gold medal winner, Dawn Staley, has been selected as the head coach of the 2007 USA Pan American Games team. Named alongside her as assistant coach are Bill Gibbons and Kathy Delaney-Smith. Although final approval by United States Olympic Committee Board of Directors is still pending, Staley was approved and selected by the USA Basketball Executive Committee.

The Pan American Games is a tournament that runs July 20 – 24 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Other competing teams are Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Columbia, Cuba, Jamaica, and Mexico.

The United States will open its tournament run playing against Columbia on July 20; compete against Argentina July 21, and then go up against the defending gold medalist, Cuba, on July 22. The semifinals for the tournament will be held July 23 and a gold medal will be awarded July 24.

The finalists competing to be on Team USA will travel to Washington D.C. for competitive training to determine the final twelve-member team. The final names will be announced before the team leaves for Brazil on July 16.

Staley is no stranger to coaching, leadership, or greatness, for that matter. She received her first international coaching job in 2006 as the assistant to the USA World Championship team. Having won 10 gold medals, one bronze, and seven first place finishes in international tournaments, she is accustomed to working with teams of a certain magnitude.

For the 2000-01 season, Staley was named Head Coach of the Temple Women’s team, which had never won their Atlantic 10 Conference, and had not had a winning record since 1989. During her tenure, the program has made a complete turn-around, making the Temple Owls Women’s team an unstoppable force in the world of women’s basketball.

Not only have the Owls won three A-10 East Division Titles, the team had a perfect 16-0 record in their conference in 2005, and made the NCAA tournament for the second time in the program’s history.

Staley’s history of prominence and success is nothing short of amazing. Her abilities are sure to make Philadelphia fans proud and bring the U.S.’s team to victory in the Pan Am games.

You can contact Sara Gamble at sportsrec@campusphilly.org.

May 25th, 2007 by Campus Philly

SEPTA’s contingency plans

If SEPTA is forced to implement its worse case contingency plan to fill a $129.6 million budget hole, the entire region will suffer the consequences, according to a study released by the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia on Friday.

Whether transit rider or driver, city dweller or suburban resident, the impact of SEPTA’s Plan B, which calls for raising fares 31 percent and cutting service by 20 percent across the board, would be felt. The plan, which is one of two being considered, assumes no additional state funding. SEPTA’s Plan A, which assumes $100 million in new state funding, would result in an 11 percent fare increase for the transit agency that hasn’t raised fares since 2001.

Under Plan B, transit riders would hand over $68 million more in fares and lose $92 million in waiting time. Drivers would face longer commutes, caused by crowded roads, and parking costs, resulting in an additional $38.9 million annually. Businesses would also feel an immediate crunch from reduced service, which would make it harder for employees to get to work, especially for early morning, night and weekend shifts.

Over the long-term, implementation of the plan would become a significant drag on the economy, reported the study, which was funded by the William Penn Foundation.

Parking fees would increase because of demand. As much as 43,800 jobs and $1.67 billion in net earnings would be lost by Philadelphia. After many of those jobs shift to the suburbs, there would be a net loss of 14,500 jobs and $868.5 million in net earnings in the five-county region. Property values would also plummet in both the city and suburbs.

“People shift to get their commute to where they want to get it to, if they can’t get it here they will shift [their job to another place or move],” said Steven Wray, executive director of the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia.

Property values in Bucks, Chester, Delaware and Montgomery counties could depreciate by as much as 6.6 percent, a net value reduction of as much as $4.45 billion. In Philadelphia, property values would fall by as much as 6.5 percent, a net value reduction of as much as $2.89 billion, with the typical home losing $7,431 in value. A typical suburban house would lose $6,867 in value.

Gov. Ed Rendell has pitched proposals to lease the Pennsylvania Turnpike and a 6.17 percent tax on oil company profits as a means of generating $1.7 billion to fix the state’s roads and bridges and fund transit agencies. Neither has been embraced by legislators, who continue to work on an alternative with time ticking away.

“I think it will be a combination of painful choices to solve all of this,” Rep. Joseph Markosek, D-Monroeville, chairman of the House Transportation Committee said. “I think if we want to cure the illness, we have to take the medicine.”

Markosek opposes flexing federal highway funds, which has been done in the past to bail out SEPTA.

“I think it will be a disadvantage if we have to go into another flex situation, then you have another Band-Aid put on transit at the expense of the roads and bridges, which are crumbling as we speak, “ Markosek said.

What will most likely be delivered by June 30 is a smorgasbord of options for the state’s transit agencies to generate local matching funds. June 30 is the target date, because it’s not only the deadline for the state general fund budget, but the Port Authority, SEPTA and many other transit agencies’ budgets, Markosek said.

“We need to give them options for dedicated local taxes,” Markosek said. “My goal and my opinion is we cannot let this go beyond (June 30) because we already have a crumbling, failing system.”

Among the options being tossed around to generate funds are tolling, such as on Route 80, Markosek said. Increases in real estate transfer taxes, the sales tax and on tobacco and alcohol are also being talked about. The higher realty transfer and sales tax rates in Philadelphia and Allegheny make it less of a likely option in those areas, but a 1 percent hike could be a viable option in the suburbs, Markosek said.

No one proposal is going to solve the problem, said Markosek. SEPTA, and the state’s transit agencies, will be expected to make concessions as well.

“We need to show people in a very vivid fashion this is not going to be business as usual and we are not going to support inefficiencies,” Markosek said. “If these agencies want more from the public in terms of their hard-earned revenue, it’s only fair to the public that they have a sense that significant reform is going on.”

This article is reprinted with permission from the Philadelphia Business Journal. You can visit the PBJ online.

You can contact Athena Merritt at amerritt@bizjournals.com.

May 25th, 2007 by Campus Philly

SEPTA’s contingency plans

If SEPTA is forced to implement its worse case contingency plan to fill a $129.6 million budget hole, the entire region will suffer the consequences, according to a study released by the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia on Friday.

Whether transit rider or driver, city dweller or suburban resident, the impact of SEPTA’s Plan B, which calls for raising fares 31 percent and cutting service by 20 percent across the board, would be felt. The plan, which is one of two being considered, assumes no additional state funding. SEPTA’s Plan A, which assumes $100 million in new state funding, would result in an 11 percent fare increase for the transit agency that hasn’t raised fares since 2001.

Under Plan B, transit riders would hand over $68 million more in fares and lose $92 million in waiting time. Drivers would face longer commutes, caused by crowded roads, and parking costs, resulting in an additional $38.9 million annually. Businesses would also feel an immediate crunch from reduced service, which would make it harder for employees to get to work, especially for early morning, night and weekend shifts.

Over the long-term, implementation of the plan would become a significant drag on the economy, reported the study, which was funded by the William Penn Foundation.

Parking fees would increase because of demand. As much as 43,800 jobs and $1.67 billion in net earnings would be lost by Philadelphia. After many of those jobs shift to the suburbs, there would be a net loss of 14,500 jobs and $868.5 million in net earnings in the five-county region. Property values would also plummet in both the city and suburbs.

“People shift to get their commute to where they want to get it to, if they can’t get it here they will shift [their job to another place or move],” said Steven Wray, executive director of the Economy League of Greater Philadelphia.

Property values in Bucks, Chester, Delaware and Montgomery counties could depreciate by as much as 6.6 percent, a net value reduction of as much as $4.45 billion. In Philadelphia, property values would fall by as much as 6.5 percent, a net value reduction of as much as $2.89 billion, with the typical home losing $7,431 in value. A typical suburban house would lose $6,867 in value.

Gov. Ed Rendell has pitched proposals to lease the Pennsylvania Turnpike and a 6.17 percent tax on oil company profits as a means of generating $1.7 billion to fix the state’s roads and bridges and fund transit agencies. Neither has been embraced by legislators, who continue to work on an alternative with time ticking away.

“I think it will be a combination of painful choices to solve all of this,” Rep. Joseph Markosek, D-Monroeville, chairman of the House Transportation Committee said. “I think if we want to cure the illness, we have to take the medicine.”

Markosek opposes flexing federal highway funds, which has been done in the past to bail out SEPTA.

“I think it will be a disadvantage if we have to go into another flex situation, then you have another Band-Aid put on transit at the expense of the roads and bridges, which are crumbling as we speak, “ Markosek said.

What will most likely be delivered by June 30 is a smorgasbord of options for the state’s transit agencies to generate local matching funds. June 30 is the target date, because it’s not only the deadline for the state general fund budget, but the Port Authority, SEPTA and many other transit agencies’ budgets, Markosek said.

“We need to give them options for dedicated local taxes,” Markosek said. “My goal and my opinion is we cannot let this go beyond (June 30) because we already have a crumbling, failing system.”

Among the options being tossed around to generate funds are tolling, such as on Route 80, Markosek said. Increases in real estate transfer taxes, the sales tax and on tobacco and alcohol are also being talked about. The higher realty transfer and sales tax rates in Philadelphia and Allegheny make it less of a likely option in those areas, but a 1 percent hike could be a viable option in the suburbs, Markosek said.

No one proposal is going to solve the problem, said Markosek. SEPTA, and the state’s transit agencies, will be expected to make concessions as well.

“We need to show people in a very vivid fashion this is not going to be business as usual and we are not going to support inefficiencies,” Markosek said. “If these agencies want more from the public in terms of their hard-earned revenue, it’s only fair to the public that they have a sense that significant reform is going on.”

This article is reprinted with permission from the Philadelphia Business Journal. You can visit the PBJ online.

You can contact Athena Merritt at amerritt@bizjournals.com.