Archive for 2009

March 24th, 2009 by Campus Philly

A Classic Theater Revised

Check out the video portion of this article

In the small Philadelphia suburb of Wayne, Anthony Wayne Theater illuminates the landscape. Holding an outdoor ticket booth and terracotta interior the theater resembles the 1920s style of cinemas. For local families and the surrounding area’s college students the Anthony Wayne Theater provides entertainment with a classic feel.

In 1928, the theater was designed by William Howard Lee after Harry Fried of Fried Enterprises purchased the land off Lancaster Ave. from longtime Wayne barber Philip DeMarse. The theater was built to replace an old film theater which was inside a nearby opera house that had a single silver screen and a projector.

After the Great Depression, the theater struggled to stay alive and eventually joined forces with Wayne Business Association in order for better promotion opportunities. It seems that this was around the time that the theater became a keystone to the town and its people.

In 1987 the theater was sold to AMC and during the ‘90s fell into disrepair. The lobby consisted of falls walls and lowered ceilings. The theater seemed to lose its way as a classic film theater until 1998 when Clearview Cinemas, the current owner of Anthony Wayne Theater, purchased the 750 seat theater.

After several closings for renovations, the theater reopened in April of 2007 with the restored walls and ceilings and the new carpets and seats that we see in the theater today.

Every first Friday of every month, Anthony Wayne Theater shows an “oldie but goodie” film to the both regulars and visitors alike for free. To find event listings of First Fridays and other special offers, check out our events calendar at CampusPhilly.org.

You can contact Andy Stettler at artsculture@campusphilly.org

March 23rd, 2009 by Campus Philly

Propagandhi

On March 14, Canada’s finest made their triumphant return to the City of Brotherly Love. Propagandhi, who have not performed within the confines of Philadelphia for the better part of a decade, lit up the Trocodero Saturday night.

For those unfamiliar, Propagandhi have been at the forefront of the modern punk scene for the last 15 years or so. Originally performing pretty standard skate punk almost reminiscent of bands like Lagwagon, NOFX, and The Bouncing Souls, they now hold a more hardcore or metal influenced sound. Currently they are touring in support of their most recent release, Supporting Caste, which was released on G7 Welcoming Committee, a record label owned by several members of the band.

Opening up the show was Philadelphia’s Witch Hunt. First I will state that the band surprised me in that they were a lot better than I thought they would be. I expected a somewhat generic straight up hardcore band, and what I got was a group that found an interesting balance between the male and female singers.

Their music was more complicated than I expected as well, which definitely made their performance something to take note of. However, they seemed to suffer the opening band plague of “small band, big stage.”

I have a feeling that this band could destroy the First Unitarian Church, but playing in the relative behemoth that is the Trocodero doesn’t exactly compliment the band. Basically, I’m saying that the band was decent at the Troc, but I strongly suggest seeing them at the Barbary on March 29.

Next up, Philly’s favorite sons played a set that ranks up there with their best. After an awkwardly long period of time between sets, Paint it Black took the stage and simply destroyed.

They went through a lot of their better songs, including the ever iconic “Past Tense, Future Perfect,” “Pink Slip,” “Shell Game Redux,” “Cannibal” and “The Ledge.” Right in the middle of their set they played a new song from their yet-to-be-recorded 7” coming out later this year.

The best way to describe this track would be that it’s perhaps more aggressive than most of the rest of their library. Frontman Dan Yemin spent most of the set not onstage, but standing against the barricade keeping the crowd from the stage. Very seldom have I seen a front man into their audience.

In reality, PIB could have probably done a show at a venue the size of the Troc by themselves and have packed the place. At the end of their set, prior to his microphone breaking, Yemin stated that it was an honor to share a stage with a band that he was influenced by. They closed with “Memorial Day,” and promptly left the stage for Propagandhi.

When Propagandhi took the stage they did so in a very unremarkable matter. They didn’t have any big opening music, nor did they do any ridiculous video background. They walked up there like 4 normal dudes and just opened up into a few songs from Supporting Caste.

This probably speaks more of the band then their actual set. They aren’t superstars, and they aren’t legends. During Paint it Black’s set, Dan Yemin might have described the band best when he said “the best thing about this scene is that there are no heroes.” Propagandhi are just good guys playing good music because that’s what they want to do.

Throughout their set they went through many of the old favorites, including “Less Talk, More Rock,” “Today’s Empire’s,” Tomorrow’s Ashes” and “Tertium Non Datur.” They talked smack on the NY Rangers and talked about cannibalism. As one would expect they also championed their causes, such as animal rights and liberal politics. All in all, it was a great show and a good return for these Canucks. Although let’s not make it another decade until they return.

You can contact Chris Banks at chrislbanks@gmail.com

March 18th, 2009 by Campus Philly

PA Ballet presents Cinderella

Celebrating 45 years, the Pennsylvania Ballet presents Sergei Prokofiev’s Cinderella.

From March 13 through March 21, the Academy of Music takes the timeless happily-ever-after classic and brings it to life. The PA Ballet brings out all the tricks in this performance with magical smoke pops, pumpkins, horse drawn carriages and elaborate costume changes. Your mind will be boggling hours after attending.

Everyone is familiar with the infamous ugly step-sisters, but no one has ever seen sisters this ugly, lacking all forms of grace and poise. These two lovely “ladies” would fool any audience member that this was a ballet. Tripping, falling and flexed feet are a part of their names. Not to mention their obnoxiously bright wardrobe containing some of the biggest ruffles on their manly shoulders and legs look amazing!

Now, not everything is exactly the same. In fact there are scenes where if you are following along with the Disney Classic, you would be surprised to see these scenes take place. These are the scenes that make this ballet stand from the crowd.

Scenes like the season’s fairies and dragonflies are uniquely choreographed with an edge describing each season flawlessly. Each season fairy brings new life with diverse ballet counts, numbers and motions. The mystical scenes show Cinderella is a brighter and exclusive light.

Luckily for Cinderella, she finds her sole mate with the perfect fit and match of a ballet slipper. After all the troubles and torments she had dealt with between her step-mother and ugly step-sisters, Cinderella finally gets her happily-ever-after.

Cinderella will be at the Academy of Music for this upcoming weekend only. Be sure not to miss out. Performances are Thursday, March 19, Friday, March 20 and Saturday, March 21 at 8 p.m. There is also a matinee performance on Saturday, March 21 at 2 p.m.

Tickets for the performance are on sale and can be ordered in advance by calling 215.893.1999 or visiting paballet.org. Prices range from $24-129.

Student Rush tickets are available for all performances as well. Come to the Academy of Music one-hour before the show and receive tickets for $10 with your college ID.

You have never seen a Cinderella quite like this before! It will have you leaving the theatre happily-ever-after.

You can contact Megan Pellegrino at megan@campusphilly.org.

March 17th, 2009 by Campus Philly

Flyers claim victory pt. 2

After a positive week, the Flyers finished their season long home stand of five games with games against Buffalo, Washington and the New York Rangers. They also visited the Rangers this week.

Tuesday’s game against Buffalo was a very good game for the team. Buffalo only managed two goals in the game. One came early in the first for the lead and the other late in the third. With 14 seconds left in the first period, Scott Hartnell began an impressive night with a power play goal. The game remained tight as both goalies let nothing by in the second period.

The Flyers exploded for four unanswered goals in the third. Jeff Carter opened the scoring 27 seconds in. Then Mike Richards and Carter each scored 1:25 apart. Hartnell ended the rout with five minutes to go. It was Hartnell’s second goal and fourth point of the night. The late Buffalo goal made it 5-2.

Thursday night it was the final showdown between two new rivals, the Flyers and the Washington Capitals. The game was tight throughout but came on the wrong end for the Flyers.

Washington opened the scoring with a late power play goal in the first period on a deflection. Each team had eight shots in the first period and the Flyers out shot the Caps in the game 36-30.

Midway through the second, Mike Richards faked a shot and fed Mike Knuble who was wide open for the tying goal. The tie did not last long as Darroll Powe had a costly turnover in the defensive end which gave Alex Ovechkin an easy goal which ended up being the deciding goal.

Caps goalie Jose Theodore was outstanding although the Flyers offense wasn’t what it usually is. Each team did have a goal disallowed in the third period which could have prevented the Flyers from tying the game.

Danny Briere, who returned against the Devils left the game Thursday against Calgary. He missed Saturday and Tuesday’s game after some side effects from his surgery. He returned Thursday and started on the fourth line while getting some power play time.

Saturday was the start of a home-and-home with the Rangers. Marty Biron was in net for the fourth straight game and was fantastic. He did get the day off on Sunday.

The Rangers jumped out early on the road with a quick goal. Scott Hartnell didn’t let the Rangers leave with a first period lead. It was his 25th of the season. Along with Hartnell, Mike Richards stayed red hot as he scored the only goal of the middle stanza.

Arron Asham, not known for his scoring, scored twice in the third period and his line mates Dan Carcillo and Claude Giroux each piled up two assists on the goals. The Rangers added a late goal in the 4-2 loss to the Flyers.

Sunday by no means was Antero Nittymaki’s best game but it was more the teams fault. Simon Gagne tied the game in the second on the power play but that was the only goal of the game for the Flyers.

The Rangers scored three power play goals on nine opportunities which did the Flyers in this game. Braydon Coburn took one of them. However, it was a major for high sticking and he was thrown out of the game. He will not face suspension. The final was 4-1 in favor of New York who is now tied for 5th in the East.

This week, the Flyers will travel to Detroit, Buffalo and Pittsburgh as the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament comes to Philadelphia.

You can contact Colin Fry at colin.fry@temple.edu

March 17th, 2009 by Campus Philly

Flyer’s claim victory

After a positive week, the Flyers finished their season long home stand of five games with games against Buffalo, Washington and the New York Rangers. They also visited the Rangers this week.

Tuesday’s game against Buffalo was a very good game for the team. Buffalo only managed two goals in the game. One came early in the first for the lead and the other late in the third. With 14 seconds left in the first period, Scott Hartnell began an impressive night with a power play goal. The game remained tight as both goalies let nothing by in the second period.

The Flyers exploded for four unanswered goals in the third. Jeff Carter opened the scoring 27 seconds in. Then Mike Richards and Carter each scored 1:25 apart. Hartnell ended the rout with five minutes to go. It was Hartnell’s second goal and fourth point of the night. The late Buffalo goal made it 5-2.

Thursday night it was the final showdown between two new rivals, the Flyers and the Washington Capitals. The game was tight throughout but came on the wrong end for the Flyers.

Washington opened the scoring with a late power play goal in the first period on a deflection. Each team had eight shots in the first period and the Flyers out shot the Caps in the game 36-30.

Midway through the second, Mike Richards faked a shot and fed Mike Knuble who was wide open for the tying goal. The tie did not last long as Darroll Powe had a costly turnover in the defensive end which gave Alex Ovechkin an easy goal which ended up being the deciding goal.

Caps goalie Jose Theodore was outstanding although the Flyers offense wasn’t what it usually is. Each team did have a goal disallowed in the third period which could have prevented the Flyers from tying the game.

Danny Briere, who returned against the Devils left the game Thursday against Calgary. He missed Saturday and Tuesday’s game after some side effects from his surgery. He returned Thursday and started on the fourth line while getting some power play time.

Saturday was the start of a home-and-home with the Rangers. Marty Biron was in net for the fourth straight game and was fantastic. He did get the day off on Sunday.

The Rangers jumped out early on the road with a quick goal. Scott Hartnell didn’t let the Rangers leave with a first period lead. It was his 25th of the season. Along with Hartnell, Mike Richards stayed red hot as he scored the only goal of the middle stanza.

Arron Asham, not known for his scoring, scored twice in the third period and his line mates Dan Carcillo and Claude Giroux each piled up two assists on the goals. The Rangers added a late goal in the 4-2 loss to the Flyers.

Sunday by no means was Antero Nittymaki’s best game but it was more the teams fault. Simon Gagne tied the game in the second on the power play but that was the only goal of the game for the Flyers.

The Rangers scored three power play goals on nine opportunities which did the Flyers in this game. Braydon Coburn took one of them. However, it was a major for high sticking and he was thrown out of the game. He will not face suspension. The final was 4-1 in favor of New York who is now tied for 5th in the East.

This week, the Flyers will travel to Detroit, Buffalo and Pittsburgh as the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament comes to Philadelphia.

You can contact Colin Fry at colin.fry@temple.edu

March 17th, 2009 by Campus Philly

That’s a wrap

If you have been to Philly, then you have most likely had a Philly cheese steak. But have you had a Philly wrap? The “Wrap Shack,” located at 120 South 18th St. in Rittenhouse Square is the holy grail of wrap eateries.

The Wrap Shack prepares over 40 different wraps. Chicken wraps like “The Scott Louis,” have juicy white meat chicken accented with crispy bacon, sautéed onions, mushrooms, garlic and cheese, all mixed together with your choice of BBQ sauce, buffalo sauce or both. It’s pretty much like a hardy, healthy stew minus the broth.

The Wrap Shack is more than just chicken wraps; steak wraps are a big seller as well as seafood wraps. Where else in the city can one find the delicacy that is the “Soft-Shell Crab” wrap or the “Shrimp Stir Fry” wrap?

The shack also sells a wide variety of vegetarian wraps. I tried the “Thai Peanut Popper,” consisting of tofu, broccoli, carrots, lettuce and the shack’s homemade Thai peanut sauce. For all of you meat eaters our there, this wrap will pull most carnivores to the other side.

If you are a breakfast lover like me, then you may want to check out the shacks breakfast wraps. Choices include egg and cheese and bacon or steak, egg and cheese.

What Drexel and UPenn students will like best about the Wrap Shack is that they deliver! Via CampusFoods.com, students can sign on and order using cash, credit or “campusfood cash.”

For the full experience I recommend dinning in. The shack is really no shack at all. Covered with beautiful wooden floors and outside dinning, the Wrap Shack rivals the atmosphere of a laid back Philly pub.

Because of the quick service I recommend the Wrap Shack if readers need an inexpensive bite to eat before taking your date out to the theatre or something of the sort. The atmosphere is perfect for dates, it is quiet enough to talk and the prices are incredibly reasonable.

You can see more on the Wrap Shack at WrapShackontheSquare.com/

You can contact Andy Stettler at artsculture@campusphilly.org

March 17th, 2009 by Campus Philly

Subtext at UArts

The University of the Arts’ Multimedia department presented a “Subtexts” EXHIBITION though Thursday March 12.

According to the website this exhibit holds, “Subtexts that remind us of social activity’s power to resist administrations that transgress the will of the people. These incisive protests remind us of our individual importance within these larger social systems, empowering us to create change.”

The event had the headline of “New Media Artists challenge political structures, encourage social activity to instigate change.” This encourages social and political change through multimedia art. The exhibit clearly touches on larger artistic and philosophical issues, and is sure to be thought provoking and visually, along with mentally stimulating.

The event featured work by Irina Botea, Margarita Benitez and Matt Kenyon and was curated by Katherine Bennett, Assistant Professor in Multimedia. The artists range in their artistic, visual, political and philosophical approaches.

Benitez’s printed Bush’s face onto toilet paper in her statement about Bush and the country he created. Kenyon’s “Notepad” used details of Iraqi civilian casualties for a political, ethical agenda while Romanian artist Botea’s “Auditions for a Revolution” made artistic, political assertions of its own.

The University’s Multimedia Department in the College of Media and Communication (CMAC) was established in 1997 and grants Bachelor of Fine Arts degrees in studies ranging from interactive media to design. Though the Department is still new, it’s expanding quite successfully, and judging from this recent exhibition, it provides a much needed, accessible means of expression and creative outlet.

For more information about the department or the multimedia exhibition, please visit www.cmacweb.org/ or call 215.717.6322.

You can contact Allison Saft at aes093@albright.edu

March 10th, 2009 by import_fixed2

Watching the Watchmen

I was afraid to see Watchmen. Afraid the film wouldn’t live up to the hype. Afraid it wouldn’t live up to Alan Moore’s original graphic novel. More importantly, I was afraid I’d fall asleep during the 1:00 a.m. showing.

In my opinion, it doesn’t live up to the hype and doesn’t live up to the graphic novel, but it doesn’t put me to sleep either.

It manages to stand out from most comic-based movies in a sense that it’s not just about an eternally good hero triumphing over the evil villain. It challenges the superhero mottos and morals through rape scenes and brutal killings. This obviously makes the movie a lot more edgy and less predictable. But because of this, I recommend the film to everyone.

Imagine that costumed heroes really existed and the setting wasn’t Gotham City or Metropolis, but New York. They all run around fighting costumed criminals although neither of them have any real powers.

Suddenly, through a freak accident, a real super hero appears who has god-like powers. Named Dr. Manhattan (Billy Crudup), he is used by the government as a tool to win the Vietnam War and scare away any other U.S. threat.

Later, society protest costumed heroes and the government eventually bans them, only allowing government sanctioned heroes to remain—Dr. Manhattan and The Comedian (Jeffrey Dean Morgan). This, however, is all in the past.

In the present, when the film begins, a linebacker-sized man by the name of Edward Blake is murdered.

Upon further inspection by the psychotic vigilante Rorschach (Jackie Earle Haley), it is learned that Edward Blake is The Comedian. But who killed The Comedian and why? “Who watches the Watchmen?”

If you’ve read the graphic novel, you’ll know almost exactly what happens next.

Zack Snyder (300), the film’s director, used the novel as a storyboard for the film, so it really feels as if the pages came to life without the novel’s soul. The way Rorschach’s ink blotted mask continuously changes throughout the film, the way Dr. Manhattan’s figure illuminates even though you can still see the freckles of his skin. The video craftsmanship was a masterpiece.

Just has Moore used the medium of the graphic novel to the fullest extent, Snyder uses the video medium in the same way. Every little detail, even those gone unnoticed, is used so that your fifth viewing of the film is different than your first.

However, the things that make the novel great are either non-existent in the film or were lost in translation.

The characters, for example, are all fairly three-dimensional in the book, but in the film most of them are much flatter. This is because the novel dedicates at least one chapter to each of the main characters while the film, although three-hours long, didn’t have the time to spare. While moviegoers may have an idea, they won’t really understand why these heroes are the way they are.

The characters that do standout do so partly because of the greatness of the original source material, but also because of the acting.

Jeffrey Dean Morgan (The Comedian / Edward Blake), Jackie Earle Haley (Rorschach / Walter Kolvacs) and Matthew Goode (Ozymandias / Adrian Veidt) were all memorable and will no doubt standout in every moviegoers mind.

Patrick Wilson (Night Owl / Daniel Dreiberg), Malin

March 10th, 2009 by Campus Philly

The Cheesesteak: Philly’s Love

Philadelphia is filled with art. Whether it is the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the many pieces displayed throughout Ben Franklin Parkway or the hundreds of performance theatres scattered throughout the city. Philly is where artists can show their talent in all forms of medium.

There is one medium that stands out from the rest. An art form mastered by few and loved by all, the masterpiece that is the Philly cheese steak.

This past week, I went to four of my favorite Philly dives to indulge in the art that is the Philly cheese steak, Geno’s, Pat’s, Jim’s and Tony Luke’s.

Now anyone from Philly can tell you, that a cheese steak is a specialty sandwich on a long roll with chopped steak and your choice of cheese, American, provolone or cheese wiz.

But what have these place done so differently unique that makes Philly the capital of the cheese steak compared to the rest of the world?

At the intersection of 9th and Passyunk in South Philadelphia, founder Joe Vento prepares his steaks on an Italian role with melted cheese and always thin cut, never greasy, rib-eye steak. Geno cuts his onions in squares, cooked only enough to enhance taste but not enough to take away that slight crunch.

Right across the street, his long time rival Pat Olivieri of “Pat’s King of Steaks” prepares his steaks in a different way. He takes an Italian role, throws on some chopped meat, onions and then the cheese making a slightly messier but surprisingly a deliciously different steak.

While Pat’s puts the cheese on top, much like Geno’s, Jim’s put the cheese on the roll. This sounds like it would make no difference but believe me, it does. Jim’s also uses chipped steak, which provides a much different taste than the competitors. This Philly and now Springfield, Pa hotspot also offers to ship their steaks anywhere in the U.S. via overnight shipping. Not a bad deal for the lonely Philadelphian in California.

The fourth dive I visited, “Tony Luke’s Steaks,” takes an even different approach to the Philly cheese steak. This Lincoln Financial steak provider uses Black Angus steak in his sandwiches followed by your choice of cheese and chopped onions.

Tony Luke’s is really pushing the envelope in terms of average steak dives, the producer recently released a frozen version of the Tony Luke’s cheese steak, a whole different approach to Jim’s 24-hour shipping idea.

These are my four favorite Philly steak dives, but this does not mean that they are the best. Please leave a comment of what your favorite Philly steak dive is so that all Philadelphians can spread taste the art of the Philly cheese steak.

You can contact Andy Stettler at artsculture@campusphilly.org

March 10th, 2009 by Campus Philly

Art Thou?: Dirt on Delight

This past weekend, I finally got the chance to check out “Dirt on Delight: Impulses that form clay” at the Institute of Contemporary Art on UPenn’s campus.

The idea of the artist taking materials like clay from the ground and turning them into something much more beautiful than the mud we avoid walking on told me that I had to write about the exhibit for this week’s “Art Thou?”

I spent about an hour looking at Ann Agee’s work of glazed porcelain on a wooden table. There were about 20 or more sculptures no larger than a forearm that consisted of either a woman or some sort of vase sculpture.

Upon first glance, the pieces looked like something my grandmother would keep in a china closet. Something like those ceramic women’s shoes that my mom collects and keeps around the house.

But when I really pushed my face closer to the pieces, what I saw was disturbing and darkly humorous. One sculpture shows a woman hanging on to a tree with a man under her. From where I was standing it looked like the two were in love or something. One of those old works of art portraying infatuation. However, I took a knee and saw the woman was not wearing any underwear and in fact, a child was half conceived between her legs!

Not what my grandmother would keep in her china closet!

After seeing this I realized that all of the pieces were a little off what I had seen at first glance, there was a mother holding a child and instead of the child feeding from the mothers blossom, he had his hand on it under her shirt.

There were three sculptures of a woman in the process of taking off her bra, and another where two women where setting bras on fire. After about an hour, a friend finally convinced me to move on to a different piece, though I knew I hadn’t seen all of Ann Agee’s hidden art.

The ICA has several exhibits right now, one entitled “Joshua Mosley: dread” uses bronze sculptures to make a six-minute, animated, black and white video which I promise will intrigue any contemporary art lover. Also, “Touch Sensative: Anthony Campuzano:” is worth checking out. The artist uses words and paint to offer the most incredible messages to his audience.

After leaving Agee’s sculptures, I walked over to a piece that seemed even more disturbing than what I had just seen. The artist Robert Arneson’s “John Figure” was a glazed stoneware piece that caught my eye. Upon walking to the piece I saw a bodiless foot with footsteps behind it. The steps came from a toilet that held a woman’s howling face where water would be.

Sitting on the toilet was a woman’s torso with only one breast, again, very affective. But what struck me even more was the sculpted ovaries which sat between the toilet and the torso.

The artist used gray and dirt-like colors which gave me a haunted reaction of realism. I loved it. I was so interested in the piece, the way the artist made the footsteps come from the toilet only to leave a foot behind. I felt that the woman in toilet must have felt like she was falling apart because of some disease.

The single breast, I think, hit me the hardest. I could only think of how affective the peace would be in advocating breast cancer and other forms of disease, an incredible reaction contemporary disease.

I invite all readers to check out the ICA at 36th Street, Philadelphia as soon as possible. I will be checking out several contemporary art museums in the future so if anyone has any ideas of some museums worth checking out, please leave a comment and you might see me covering your favorite Philly museum in the next few weeks.

You can contact Andy Stettler at artsculture@campusphilly.org

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