Top 10 Words to Avoid on a Resume

posted by , Drexel, '13 on April 9, 2013 at 9:30 am

Okay, so you’ve found a job posting you’re completely in love with. You review the job description, the skill set and you’re ready to submit your resume. Before you hit the send button, make sure to read our top 10 list of common words to nix from your resume so you can be one step closer to your dream job!

1. Hard Worker 

Almost all applicants claim to be “hard workers.” Saying you’re a hard worker doesn’t make you stand out from the rest of the crowd! To impress your employer, explain how you’ve gone that extra mile by citing examples.

2. Self-starter 

Instead of using the term “self-starter” on your resume, why don’t you illustrate times when you’ve taken initiative without managerial supervision? Hiring managers like examples, not just words.

3. Team Player 

This word is a given. Of course companies want you to be a team player. Showing that you have been a team player in previous projects and situations gives the employer the idea that you can collaborate in a group that has multiple ideas, help your team mates during stressful projects, and it also shows your ability to handle multiple personalities in a team situation. Show your employers how you’ve worked as a team player. 

4. Highly Qualified

Show the employer how you’re highly qualified for the position. Do you have skill sets or qualifications that prove that you’ll be a good fit for the role? Use descriptive language to quantify your biggest achievements. The employer will know if you’re highly qualified for the position based on how you describe your past achievements.

5. Dynamic

Unless you’ve created a way to cure world hunger or are a superhero, your resume will be just fine sans the word dynamic.

6. Problem Solver 

Employers want to see evidence that you’re a problem solver. How have you solved conflicts in a team setting? Or how have you overcome hurdles in your work or academic career? Maybe you’ve devised a better system to make something operate more efficiently.

7. Familiar With

When you’re writing your skill set and qualifications, instead of using the term “familiar with” to describe your knowledge of Microsoft Excel, use descriptive language such as beginner, intermediate, proficient, or advanced to portray to the employer your knowledge of the particular program. It will show your level of expertise in a detailed sense rather than broader one.

8. Reliable 

If I could give you my top word to omit from your resume, it would be the word “reliable.” Use the space to go into more detail. Employers expect you to be dependable and show up on time to work, team meetings, and any other projects. Being reliable allows others to trust you and trust in the work that you do.

9. Flexible 

Show your employer how you’ve adapted to changes in the workplace instead of just telling them. Change is constantly happening all around us. In the workplace, new managers are constantly coming and going, new employers are hired each and every day, and new regulations can be put into place at any time. Explain how you’ve successfully responded in situations which required you to adapt and be flexible.

10. People Person 

Showing skills of effective communication between coworkers, clients, managers, and stakeholders are a vital component in any job function that you do. Employers want to see that you can successfully communicate your ideas. This includes communicating with a party you may have a disagreement with, and showing that you can win over that client based on how you communicate the product or service.

The moral of the story? Words are a powerful thing, but when it comes to resumes, employers want you to show them why they should hire you for the job, not because you tell them to with any of the words listed above!

You can contact Robin at rss66@drexel.edu

comments
Tagged under: , , , ,


Twitter: campusphilly
Online Internship Fair