Martha Graham Cracker’s Choral Extravaganza

Martha, the band, and some of Philly’s biggest voices.

The world’s tallest and hairiest drag queen returns with her band to FringeArts for an unforgettable evening of stories, live music, and special guests.

Martha Graham Cracker is played by Pig Iron Theatre Company co-founder Dito van Reigersberg and has been performing in Philadelphia for more than 14 years. She’s also played to sold out rooms in Austin, New York, Washington D.C., California, Las Vegas and Europe.

Forget everything you think you know about drag and come party with Miss Martha Graham Cracker. No two shows are ever the same.

$30 general
$15 students & 25-and-under
$2 FringeACCESS member
Member Discounts Available

Fase, Four Movements to the Music of Steve Reich

Before she became an internationally acclaimed choreographer, Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker was a young Belgian student moving to New York City with a music cassette in her travel pack. The deceptively simple repetitive compositions by American minimalist Steve Reich became the soundtrack and inspiration for a breakthrough choreographic work—three duets and one solo credited with creating a new vocabulary of movement for contemporary dance.

Both the music and the dance start from the principle of phase shifting through tiny variations: movements that are initially perfectly synchronous gradually start slipping and sliding, resulting in an ingenious play of continuously changing forms and patterns.

Premiered in 1982, Fase, Four Movements to the Music of Steve Reich laid the foundation for a groundbreaking choreographic career. Having always danced Fase herself, De Keersmaeker now passes her first performance piece on to two new dancers.

Visit our website for a full list of dates and times: https://fringearts.com/

The Eighth Annual Center City Jazz Festival

The Eighth Annual Center City Jazz Festival features a lineup of blockbuster performers on Saturday, April 27, 2019 as part of Philadelphia Jazz Appreciation Month. Attendees can expect a jam-packed schedule of 20 bands performing at five venues over six hours, all within walking distance of each other in the heart of Center City.

One ticket provides access to all performances. The list of scheduled performers is available online at www.CCJazzFest.com.

Tickets: $20 in advance; $25 day of festival

Top 5 Events:
Immerse Yourself in the Arts

Philadelphia is a city thriving with art, and as a student you should immerse yourself in as many creative experiences as possible. Whether it be visual art, dance, theater, or music, there are so many opportunities to engage in the arts community first-hand. In the summer months, art exhibits of all types are held more often and are typically held outdoors in the welcoming weather. The best part of these events? They fit a college students’ budget, as most of them are free and open to the public. Here’s a list of some exciting chances to engage in different events in the art community of Philly this week!

Pasion y Arte Flamenco Co. Performance in Public Spaces 
When: Friday, June 12, 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. Where: The Porch at 30th Street Station. Cost: Free!

Pasion y Arte Flamenco is the premier all-female flamenco dance company in Philly and will be presenting an hour-long, interactive, and fun dance performance on the outdoor porch of 30th street Station. The entertaining performance will include a brief history of the Flamenco dance, Flamenco dancers and musicians from the company, live music, and an invitation for audience members to join in the Flamenco dancing and have fun.

ARTspiration!
When: Saturday, June 13, 10 a.m.- 3 p.m. Where: Fleisher Art Memorial, 719 Catharine Street. Cost: Free!

Fleisher will be holding its annual community arts festival ARTspiration!, which has become so popular it is often attended by more than 2,000 people. This free event that was started in 2007 will be held on Catharine Street right outside Fleisher’s historic campus. This festival will cater to all ages and offer a look into the creativity and art that is so present in Philadelphia. Activities include music and dance performances and art-making activities led by local artists.

West Park Arts Fest
When: Saturday, June 13, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Where: West Park Cultural Center, 4201 Parkside Avenue. Cost: Free!

The 8th annual West Park Arts Fest will be held at the West Park Cultural Center and celebrate different cultures and the diverse community of Philadelphia through music and dance. The celebration will include outdoor singers and performers, cultural dance groups, and activities for children such as arts and crafts under a pavilion.

Graffito Works at Shofuso House
When: Sunday, June 14, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. Where: Shofuso Japanese House and Garden, Landsdowne Drive and Horticultural Drive. Cost: Free after admission!

Graffito Works is an interactive, site-specific dance performance that is open to the public, and is choreographed and directed by Steven Weisz. The on-site dance will show audience members a collaborative and thoughtful work as the dancers improvisational skills are shown through their interactions with each other, the site, and objects around them.

Open Spaces: An Art in the Open Exhibition
When: Tuesday June 16, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. Where: Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, 8480 Hagys Mill Road. Cost: Free!

The scenic and nature-oriented Schuylkill Center is hosting their Open Spaces outdoor arts exhibition. Nine artists will present their work both indoors and on the trails of the Schuylkill Center. These artists spent three days creating their work in public, some artists creating string and ribbon sculptures, and leaving their creative processes visible to audience members. The event will also hold a reception to celebrate these talented artists and offer light refreshments in the gallery, along with a guided walk to the outdoor works.

Top 5 Events: Black History Month

To celebrate Black History Month, we’re offering a look at venues and events that honor the importance of African-American figures in history and offer a celebration of contemporary African-American excellence. From museum explorations of historical art and happenings to modern film and poetry, this week’s Top 5 Events both take you back to the cultural history of African-Americans and offer a sample of the ways African-Americans shape Philadelphia today. So learn something and enjoy everything, because this lineup is a glimpse into history and filled with intriguing opportunities.

Underground Railroad in Philadelphia
When: February 7 & 8, 3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Where: Independence Visitor Center Theater, Market Street, Philadelphia Cost: Free!

The Underground Railroad was an extensive network of routes and safe houses used by slaves as a passage to free states and Canada during the 18th and 19th centuries. Philadelphia was a notable stop on this escape route to freedom. You can celebrate Black History Month by learning about the people and places connected to this pivotal era in American history at Independence National Historical Park, where a slide program details Philadelphia’s role in the Underground Railroad system. A park ranger will guide you through the program, highlighting the stories of Henry “Box” Brown, “The Father of the Underground Railroad” William Still, and more. Be sure to check out Independence National Historical Park’s other Black History Month program and events!

Represent: 200 Years of African American Art
When: Now through April 15th Where: Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia Cost: Free with admission ($14)

The Philadelphia Museum of Art houses numerous collections of fine art, and among them are several by African-American artists. This marquee exhibition brings together more than 75 works from the museum’s growing collection, and celebrates over 50 artists that explore an array of mediums and themes. Some of the works include pieces by Henry Ossawa Tanner, Horace Pippin, Alma Thomas, and Carrie Mae Weems. The exhibition travels chronologically through critical historical periods, beginning with pre-Civil War works and moving through the Harlem Renaissance and into contemporary pieces. This historical and progressive breadth offers a wide perspective on the progression of African-American art.  Works vary from decorative pottery and sculptures to modern abstract pieces and compelling photography, so there’s something for everyone to enjoy!

Tides of Freedom: African Presence on the Delaware River
When: Daily, 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Where: Independence Seaport Museum, Penn’s Landing, Philadelphia Cost: $10

George Washington famously crossed the Delaware River during the American Revolution, but a history beyond the well-known one existed on this waterway. Tides of Freedom: African Presence on the Delaware River explores the concept of freedom by examining the African perspective along the Delaware River. The show was created by a committee of leading African-American scholars and was curated by University of Pennsylvania’s Tukufu Zuberi. Zuberi is a practiced storyteller and PBS History Detectives host, and will introduce each major section in the exhibition. Themes of enslavement, emancipation, Jim Crow, and Civil Rights highlight the show, and uncovered artifacts will be on display in the interactive museum. This exhibition offers the opportunity to examine a story that is part of Philadelphia and American history, one that has implications historically and contemporarily. Engaging storytelling and photos, videos, and artwork explore the meaning of “freedom” in this great exhibit by the water.

Ursula Rucker: My Father’s Daughter
When: February 6 & 7, 8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. Where: Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, 3689 Walnut Street, Philadelphia Cost: $20

Philadelphia-born Urusla Rucker is a spoken word recording artist whose compelling poetry techniques and stage presence make her an explosively strong performer. She has toured with 4Hero and King Britt, and has gained national and international acclaim. The show My Father’s Daughter is a live, epic poem that is accompanied by music and video. In the performance, Rucker tells her personal story of survival, one that traverses both pain and victory. Her raw and soulful poetry draws the parallels between her mother’s life and her own, illuminating how her relationships and struggles have shaped Rucker into the woman she is today. This show will be electric and inspiring; don’t miss out! Check out some of Rucker’s other work here.

Mysterious Travelers Concert Series: Anwar Marshall
When: February 9, 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Where:  Free Library of Philadelphia – Parkway Central Library, 1901 Vine Street, Philadelphia Cost: Free!

The Music Department at the Parkway Central Library, in collaboration with the Philadelphia Jazz Project and the Producers’ Guild, present free monthly concerts that feature up-and-coming artists as well as veteran performers. This month features Anwar Marshall, drummer an co-leader of a ten-piece ensemble called Fresh Cut Orchestra. The ensemble regularly plays at the Painter Bride Art Center and the Kimmel Center. Marshall’s music has collaborated with noteworthy musicians Dave Douglas, Tim Warfield, Duane Eubanks, and many others. These deep grooves and soulful sounds are sure to be entertaining, so don’t miss this free show!

Top 5 Events: Art and Culture

Sunday is Super Bowl weekend! And gameday, with all its food and friends and fun, is sure to be entertaining even if you don’t care who’s playing. So, to balance out all of that sports-centric excitement, this week’s Top 5 will focus on the opposite end of the entertainment spectrum: art and culture. From film and music to photography and the Chinese New Year, the events going on in Philly are sure to fill your cultural inclinations. So get out there,  learn something or appreciate something, and enjoy the vibrant artistic expression of the city!

AVA After Dark: La bohème
When: January 28th, 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Where: Academy of Vocal Arts, 1920 Spruce Street, Philadelphia Cost: $10

La bohème is one of the world’s most performed operas, and you can see AVA’s production of it for just $10. Nineteenth century Paris comes to life on the stage, as quixotic depictions of love and loss define the lives of starving artists. The music is composed by Giacomo Puccini, who is considered one of the best Italian operatic composers; his melodies are well-known to anyone familiar with opera. Opera aficionado or not (hey, opera music can be fun), this performance is definitely a must-see! After the performance, head to the Café Momus for French-style treats and brewery (21+). Get your tickets here!

Sanctuary Series: History of Early Photography in Philadelphia
When: January 28th, 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Where: Fleisher Art Memorial, 719 Catharine Street, Philadelphia Cost: $10

In the mid-19th century, America was already internationally known for its photography (in its early forms, daguerreotype production). This recognition stemmed largely from developments that were being made in Philadelphia. Alice Cutler will present a talk on the boom of photography in Philadelphia. Ms. Cutler currently manages the Alexander Artway Archive in Philadelphia, and received a Master of Arts in Photography from Sotheby’s Institute of Art in London. Her discussion will explore how photography was transformed by the scientific community, as well as how it was used and shaped by entrepreneurs in Philadelphia from 1839-1851. If you have an appreciation for photography or history, or are interested in learning more about the technological and artistic progression of the medium, this event is an intriguing opportunity.

St. Lawrence Quartet
When: January 28th, 8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. Where: Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, 1528 Walnut Street, Philadelphia Cost: Free!

Enjoy a night of string sounds when the St. Lawrence Quartet rolls into Philly. Quartet-in-Residence at Stanford University, the group’s performances are internationally acclaimed for their exquisite and exciting musical performances.  The group will be performing pieces composed by Haydn, Berger, and Adams. Even if you normally appreciate music that is the opposite of this group’s forte, such as pop or folk or rock, this is an opportunity to see one of today’s most impressive chamber music groups—so don’t miss out. Open Arts members can attend the performance for free, so be sure to get your tickets here!

Penn Museum World Culture Series: Chinese New Year Celebration
When: January 31st, 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Where: Penn Museum, 3260 South Street, Philadelphia Cost: Free with admission ($10)

February 19 will mark the Chinese New Year, the Year of Sheep (or Goat). Celebrate the approaching New Year with a day of festivities at Penn Museum! There will be music and dance performances, Tai Chi and Kung Fu demonstrations, and crafts. You can exercise your creativity at a variety of workshops, including calligraphy, tangram, and paper cutting. Also be sure to check out the amazing galleries featuring Chinese and Buddhist art. Don’t miss this fun day of celebrations!

Penn Humanities Forum: “Pariah” Screening 
When: February 4th, 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Where:  International House, 3701 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia Cost: Free!

The Penn Humanities Forum’s series featuring New Black Cinematography continues this week with a free screening of the 2011 film Pariah. This cinema series honors the work of Bradford Young, the acclaimed cinematographer whose work captures visions of African-American communities from New York City to Mississippi. He again presents a visual masterpiece in Pariah, which tells the story of Alike, a 17-year-old African American teenager who discovers her lesbian identity and must handle her family’s response. The film won the Sundance Excellence in Cinematography Award. Enjoy a night of film with this commended screening!